Angeles Secord

Overview:

My primary research interest has focused on angiogenesis, molecular signatures, clinical trial development, and ovarian cancer. My fundamental goal is to develop a strong translational research program at Duke University in the Gynecologic Oncology Division where knowledge we glean from our basic science research can be incorporated into our clinical trial program. Specifically on anti-angiogenic therapy and molecular tumor signatures to direct therapy in patients with ovarian cancer to determine if a strategy that incorporates both clinical and genomic information can improve clinical outcome, minimize unnecessary toxicity, and impact positively on quality of life.
In addition I am interested in robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery for women with endometrial, ovarian, and cervical cancers as well as for benign gynecologic conditions.

Positions:

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gynecologic Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1994

University of Washington

Resident, Obstetrics & Gynecology

Duke University

Grants:

Predictive value of the IL6 pathway to direct anti-angiogenic therapy in advanced ovarian cancer

Administered By
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gynecologic Oncology
Awarded By
American Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Biomarker Discovery to Direct Bevacizumab Therapy in Ovarian Cancer - Blood-based Angiome Profiling

Administered By
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gynecologic Oncology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

TESARO LUNG AND ENDOMETRIAL CANCER PRACTICUM

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
TESARO
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

SGNTV-002: Open Label Phase 2 Study of Tisotumab Vedotin for Patients with Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer with a Safety Run-in of a Dose-Dense Regimen

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Seattle Genetics, Inc
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Multicenter, Open-label, Randomized, Phase 3 Trial to Compare the Efficacy and Safety of Lenvatinib in Combination with Pembrolizumab Versus Treatment of Physician¿s Choice in Participants with Adva

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Merck Sharp & Dohme
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) 2021 meeting report: Scaling new heights with innovative cancer care.

Authors
Gray, HJ; Secord, AA
MLA Citation
Gray, Heidi J., and Angeles Alvarez Secord. “Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) 2021 meeting report: Scaling new heights with innovative cancer care.Gynecol Oncol, vol. 163, no. 1, Oct. 2021, pp. 5–10. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2021.04.022.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1487556
PMID
34167821
Source
pubmed
Published In
Gynecol Oncol
Volume
163
Published Date
Start Page
5
End Page
10
DOI
10.1016/j.ygyno.2021.04.022

Ipatasertib, an oral AKT inhibitor, effectively inhibits cell proliferation and migration, and induces apoptosis in endometrioid and serous endometrial cancer cell lines in vitro (Endometrial Cancer Molecularly Targeted Therapy Consortium)

Authors
Buckingham, L; O'Donnell, J; Hao, T; Secord, AA; Zhou, C; Bae-Jump, V
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1483411
Source
wos-lite
Published In
European Journal of Gynaecological Oncology
Volume
42
Published Date
Start Page
387
End Page
388

Real-world treatment patterns of maintenance therapy in platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer.

OBJECTIVES: The clinical utility of maintenance therapy (MT) for patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer has been validated in several clinical trials. We assessed "real-world" treatment patterns using an electronic health record (EHR) database. METHODS: A retrospective study of patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer between January 1, 2011 and July 31, 2019 was conducted using the US nationwide Flatiron Health (EHR)-derived de-identified database. Patients were included if they received second- or third-line (2 L or 3 L) platinum-based chemotherapy (PBCT). Information regarding biomarker status was obtained. RESULTS: 2292 patients with ovarian cancer received at least two lines of therapy. 222 patients completed PBCT on or after March 1, 2017 and had ≥2 months of active surveillance or received MT with poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi) or bevacizumab. 46 (20%) had BRCA mutations (BRCAm), 132 (59%) had a wildtype BRCA (BRCAwt) gene, and 47 (21%) were unknown. Of patients with BRCAm, 63% received a PARPi, 17% received bevacizumab, and 20% underwent active surveillance. Of patients with BRCAwt, 40% received a PARPi, 23% received bevacizumab, and 36% underwent active surveillance. MT was more common in those with younger age and a BRCA mutation. PARPi use increased on average by 1.3% every 3 months (p = .02) with no statistically significant change in use of bevacizumab. CONCLUSIONS: In this real-world population, MT is becoming progressively more common following 2 L or 3 L PBCT regardless of biomarker status. The results provide insight into the shifting treatment patterns for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer.
Authors
MLA Citation
Moss, Haley A., et al. “Real-world treatment patterns of maintenance therapy in platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer.Gynecol Oncol, vol. 163, no. 1, Oct. 2021, pp. 50–56. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2021.07.026.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1489791
PMID
34301411
Source
pubmed
Published In
Gynecol Oncol
Volume
163
Published Date
Start Page
50
End Page
56
DOI
10.1016/j.ygyno.2021.07.026

Obesity and altered angiogenic-related gene expression in endometrial cancer.

OBJECTIVES: Evaluate association between obesity and angiogenic-related gene expression in endometrial cancer (EC). Evaluate interaction between diet and metformin on angiogenic-related gene expression. METHODS: We evaluated the association between 168 human angiogenic-related genes and body mass index (BMI) in the TCGA Uterine Corpus Endometrial Carcinoma cohort (endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC) cohort n = 290, and copy number high cohort n = 55), an independent validation cohort from Gynecologic Cancer Center of Excellence (GYN-COE) (n = 62) and corresponding 185 homologous mouse genes in an LKB1fl/flp53fl/fl mouse model of EC (n = 20). Mice received 60% of calories from fat in a high-fat diet (HFD), mimicking diet-induced obesity, versus 10% of calories from fat in a low-fat diet (LFD). After tumor growth, HFD (n = 5) and LFD (n = 5) mice were treated with metformin (200 mg/kg/day) or control. Whole transcriptome analysis of mouse tumors was performed using RNA-Seq. RESULTS: At a false-discovery rate of 10%, twenty-one angiogenic-related genes were differentially expressed with respect to BMI when adjusting for grade in the TCGA EEC cohort. Evaluation of these genes in the mouse model control group revealed association between increased Edil3 expression in HFD versus LFD mice (2.5-fold change (FC); unadjusted p = 0.03). An interaction was observed for expression of Edil3 between diet and metformin treatment (unadjusted p = 0.009). Association between BMI and increased expression of EDIL3 was validated in one of four EDIL3 probesets in the GYN-COE cohort (p = 0.0011, adjusted p = 0.0342). CONCLUSIONS: Obesity may promote tumor progression via differential modulation of angiogenic pathways in EEC. Our exploratory findings demonstrated that EDIL3 may be a candidate gene of interest.
Authors
Cobb, LP; Siamakpour-Reihani, S; Zhang, D; Qin, X; Owzar, K; Zhou, C; Conrads, TP; Maxwell, GL; Darcy, KM; Bateman, NW; Litzi, T; Bae-Jump, V; Secord, AA
MLA Citation
Cobb, Lauren Patterson, et al. “Obesity and altered angiogenic-related gene expression in endometrial cancer.Gynecol Oncol, Sept. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2021.08.010.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497547
PMID
34538531
Source
pubmed
Published In
Gynecol Oncol
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.ygyno.2021.08.010

The preferences of women with ovarian cancer for oral versus intravenous recurrence regimens.

OBJECTIVE: To assess preferences of women with ovarian cancer regarding features of available anti-cancer regimens for platinum-resistant, biomarker-positive disease, with an emphasis on oral PARP inhibitor and standard intravenous (IV) chemotherapy regimens. METHODS: A discrete-choice-experiment preferences survey was designed, tested, and administered to women with ovarian cancer, with 11 pairs of treatment profiles defined using seven attributes (levels/ranges): regimen (oral daily, IV weekly, IV monthly); probability of progression-free (PFS) at 6 months (40%-60%); probability of PFS at 2 years (10%-20%); nausea (none, moderate); peripheral neuropathy (none, mild, moderate); memory problems (none, mild); and total out-of-pocket cost ($0 to $10,000). RESULTS: Of 123 participants, 38% had experienced recurrence, 25% were currently receiving chemotherapy, and 18% were currently taking a PARP inhibitor. Given attributes and levels, the relative importance weights (sum 100) were: 2-year PFS, 28; cost, 27; 6-month PFS, 19; neuropathy,14; memory problems, nausea, and regimen, all ≤5. To accept moderate neuropathy, participants required a 49% (versus 40%) chance of PFS at 6 months or 14% (versus 10%) chance at 2 years. Given a 3-way choice where PFS and cost were equal, 49% preferred a monthly IV regimen causing mild memory problems, 47% preferred an oral regimen causing moderate nausea, and 4% preferred a weekly IV regimen causing mild memory and mild neuropathy. CONCLUSIONS: These findings challenge the assumption that oral anti-cancer therapies are universally preferred by patients and demonstrate that there is no "one size fits all" regimen that is preferable to women with ovarian cancer when considering recurrence treatment regimens.
Authors
Havrilesky, LJ; Scott, AL; Davidson, BA; Secord, AA; Yang, J-C; Johnson, FR; Gonzalez, JM; Reed, SD
MLA Citation
Havrilesky, Laura J., et al. “The preferences of women with ovarian cancer for oral versus intravenous recurrence regimens.Gynecol Oncol, vol. 162, no. 2, Aug. 2021, pp. 440–46. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2021.05.022.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484394
PMID
34053748
Source
pubmed
Published In
Gynecol Oncol
Volume
162
Published Date
Start Page
440
End Page
446
DOI
10.1016/j.ygyno.2021.05.022