Rebecca Shelby

Overview:

Rebecca Shelby, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University and the Director of Education and Training for the Duke Cancer Patient Support Program.  Dr. Shelby is a member of the Duke Pain Prevention and Treatment Research Program and the Duke Cancer Control and Population Sciences Program. Dr. Shelby completed her graduate training in clinical psychology at the Ohio State University and her clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Duke University Medical Center.  Her research focuses on developing and evaluating behavioral interventions for cancer patients, management of cancer pain and treatment side effects, and improving adherence to recommended care. Dr. Shelby serves on the Duke clinical psychology internship faculty and supervises clinical psychology fellows, interns, and clinical psychology graduate practicum students completing clinical rotations as part of the Duke Cancer Patient Support Program.   

Positions:

Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2006

Ohio State University

Grants:

Improving Adherence to Recommended Surveillance in Breast Cancer Survivors

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

A feasible and acceptable multicultural psychosocial intervention targeting symptom management in the context of advanced breast cancer.

OBJECTIVE: Advanced breast cancer patients around the world experience high symptom burden (ie, distress, pain, and fatigue) and are in need of psychosocial interventions that target symptom management. This study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and engagement of a psychosocial intervention that uses cognitive-behavioral strategies along with mindfulness and values-based activity to enhance patients' ability to manage symptoms of advanced disease in a cross-cultural setting (United States and Singapore). Pre-treatment to post-treatment outcomes for distress, pain, and fatigue were compared between intervention recipients and waitlisted controls. METHODS: A pilot randomized controlled trial included women with advanced breast cancer (N = 85) that were recruited in the United States and Singapore. Participants either received the four session intervention or were put on a waitlist. Descriptive statistics and effect size of symptom change were calculated. RESULTS: The psychosocial intervention was found to be feasible as indicated through successful trial accrual, low study attrition (15% ), and high intervention adherence (77% completed all sessions). Acceptability (ie, program satisfaction and cultural sensitivity) and engagement to the study intervention (ie, practice of skills taught) were also high. Anxiety, depression, and fatigue scores remained stable or improved among intervention participants while the same symptoms worsened in the control group. In general, effect sizes are larger in the US sample compared with the Singapore sample. CONCLUSIONS: The cognitive-behavioral, mindfulness, and values-based intervention is feasible, acceptable, and engaging for advanced breast cancer patients in a cross-cultural setting and has potential for efficacy. Further larger-scaled study of intervention efficacy is warranted.
Authors
Teo, I; Vilardaga, JP; Tan, YP; Winger, J; Cheung, YB; Yang, GM; Finkelstein, EA; Shelby, RA; Kamal, AH; Kimmick, G; Somers, TJ
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1421436
PMID
31703146
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psychooncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/pon.5275

WEIGHT-RELATED BEHAVIORS OF CANCER SURVIVORS & PARTNERS: INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT AND RESULTS OF A PILOT DYADIC INTERVENTION

Authors
Dorfman, CS; Winger, JG; Somers, T; Shelby, RA; Kimmick, G; Craighead, L; Patel, ML; Keefe, FJ
MLA Citation
Dorfman, Caroline S., et al. “WEIGHT-RELATED BEHAVIORS OF CANCER SURVIVORS & PARTNERS: INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT AND RESULTS OF A PILOT DYADIC INTERVENTION.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 53, OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2019, pp. S709–S709.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1398066
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
53
Published Date
Start Page
S709
End Page
S709

Patient Perceptions of Breast Cancer Risk in Imaging-Detected Low-Risk Scenarios and Thresholds for Desired Intervention: A Multi-Institution Survey.

PURPOSE: To determine women's perceptions of breast cancer risk and thresholds for desiring biopsy when considering BI-RADS 3 and 4A scenarios and recommendations, respectively. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Women presenting for screening mammography from five geographically diverse medical centers were surveyed. Demographic information and baseline anxiety were queried. Participants were presented with scenarios of short-term imaging follow-up recommendations (ie, BI-RADS 3) and biopsy recommendations (ie, BI-RADS 4A) for low-risk mammographic abnormalities and asked to estimate their breast cancer risk for each scenario. Participants reported the threshold (ie, likelihood of cancer) where they would feel comfortable undergoing short-term imaging follow-up and biopsy and their anticipated regret for choosing short-term follow-up versus biopsy. RESULTS: Analysis of 2,747 surveys showed that participants estimated breast cancer risk of 32.8% for a BI-RADS 3 and 41.1% for a BI-RADS 4A scenarios are significantly greater rates than clinically established rates (<2% [P < .001] and 2%-10% [P < .001], respectively). Over one-half (55.4%) of participants reported they would never want imaging follow-up if there was any chance of cancer; two-thirds (66.2%) reported they would desire biopsy if there was any chance of cancer. Participants reported greater anticipated regret (P < .001) and less relief and confidence (P < .001) with the decision to undergo follow-up imaging versus biopsy. CONCLUSION: Women overestimate breast cancer risk associated with both BI-RADS 3 and 4A scenarios and desire very low biopsy thresholds. Greater anticipated regret and less relief and confidence was reported with the choice to undergo short-term imaging follow-up compared with biopsy.
Authors
Grimm, LJ; Shelby, RA; Knippa, EE; Langman, EL; Miller, LS; Whiteside, BE; Soo, MSC
MLA Citation
Grimm, Lars J., et al. “Patient Perceptions of Breast Cancer Risk in Imaging-Detected Low-Risk Scenarios and Thresholds for Desired Intervention: A Multi-Institution Survey..” J Am Coll Radiol, vol. 15, no. 6, June 2018, pp. 911–19. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jacr.2018.02.010.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1311164
PMID
29606632
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American College of Radiology : Jacr
Volume
15
Published Date
Start Page
911
End Page
919
DOI
10.1016/j.jacr.2018.02.010

Imaging-Guided Core-Needle Breast Biopsy: Impact of Meditation and Music Interventions on Patient Anxiety, Pain, and Fatigue.

PURPOSE: To evaluate the impact of guided meditation and music interventions on patient anxiety, pain, and fatigue during imaging-guided breast biopsy. METHODS: After giving informed consent, 121 women needing percutaneous imaging-guided breast biopsy were randomized into three groups: (1) guided meditation; (2) music; (3) standard-care control group. During biopsy, the meditation and music groups listened to an audio-recorded, guided, loving-kindness meditation and relaxing music, respectively; the standard-care control group received supportive dialogue from the biopsy team. Immediately before and after biopsy, participants completed questionnaires measuring anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Scale), biopsy pain (Brief Pain Inventory), and fatigue (modified Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue). After biopsy, participants completed questionnaires assessing radiologist-patient communication (modified Questionnaire on the Quality of Physician-Patient Interaction), demographics, and medical history. RESULTS: The meditation and music groups reported significantly greater anxiety reduction (P values < .05) and reduced fatigue after biopsy than the standard-care control group; the standard-care control group reported increased fatigue after biopsy. The meditation group additionally showed significantly lower pain during biopsy, compared with the music group (P = .03). No significant difference in patient-perceived quality of radiologist-patient communication was noted among groups. CONCLUSIONS: Listening to guided meditation significantly lowered biopsy pain during imaging-guided breast biopsy; meditation and music reduced patient anxiety and fatigue without compromising radiologist-patient communication. These simple, inexpensive interventions could improve women's experiences during core-needle breast biopsy.
Authors
Soo, MS; Jarosz, JA; Wren, AA; Soo, AE; Mowery, YM; Johnson, KS; Yoon, SC; Kim, C; Hwang, ES; Keefe, FJ; Shelby, RA
MLA Citation
Soo, Mary Scott, et al. “Imaging-Guided Core-Needle Breast Biopsy: Impact of Meditation and Music Interventions on Patient Anxiety, Pain, and Fatigue..” J Am Coll Radiol, vol. 13, no. 5, May 2016, pp. 526–34. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jacr.2015.12.004.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1120094
PMID
26853501
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American College of Radiology : Jacr
Volume
13
Published Date
Start Page
526
End Page
534
DOI
10.1016/j.jacr.2015.12.004

DISSEMINATION OF THE BIOBEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION: FROM CANCER TO HEALTH

Authors
Dorfman, CS; Brothers, BM; Carpenter, KM; Frierson, GM; Shelby, RA; Thornton, LM; Andersen, BL
MLA Citation
Dorfman, Caroline S., et al. “DISSEMINATION OF THE BIOBEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION: FROM CANCER TO HEALTH.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 47, SPRINGER, Apr. 2014, pp. S166–S166.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1032859
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
47
Published Date
Start Page
S166
End Page
S166