Sophia Smith

Overview:

Dr. Sophia Smith is an Associate Professor at the Duke School of Nursing and earned her PhD and MSW degrees at UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work. Her research explores ways to improve the quality of cancer care including post-treatment survivorship and palliative care with a primary focus on leveraging technology in delivering behavioral health interventions to the community. She is leading efforts to integrate clinical cancer care and research as a means to build the body of scientific evidence that forms the foundation of evidence-based practice through her leadership as Association of Oncology Social Work (AOSW) Research Director and membership on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Survivorship Guidelines Panel and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Survivorship Committee. Dr. Smith’s research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society, NCCN, and Pfizer Grants for Independent Learning and Change.

Positions:

Associate Professor in the School of Nursing, with tenure

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Member in the Duke Clinical Research Institute

Duke Clinical Research Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.S.W. 2001

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Ph.D. 2007

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Grants:

Symptom Burden and Quality of Life in Multiple Myeloma Patients

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Pillars4Life: An Online Self-Management Curriculum for Cancer Survivors

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
Pfizer, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Advanced symptom burden and quality of life in multiple myeloma patients

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Advanced symptom burden and quality of life in multiple myeloma patients

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Human flourishing in adolescents with cancer: Experiences of pediatric oncology health care professionals.

<h4>Purpose</h4>This study explores human flourishing (HF) in adolescents with cancer (AC) as witnessed by their health care providers, and it develops a list of critical attributes associated with HF to describe the positive outcomes witnessed.<h4>Design and methods</h4>Our study used a qualitative descriptive design incorporating data from an open-ended electronic survey and semi-structured individual interviews with 17 pediatric oncology health care providers.<h4>Results</h4>We found 3 major themes (positive forward motion, connectedness, and self-character) representing 11 critical attributes of human flourishing in AC: (1) initiative and enterprise, (2) positivity and evocativeness, (3) tranquility and maturity, (4) perseverance and tenacity, (5) compassion and empathy, (6) social engagement and connection, (7) wisdom and translation into life, (8) supportive background, (9) self-awareness and self-agency, (10) transcendence and full potential, and (11) meaning-making.<h4>Conclusions</h4>Understanding the concept of HF as it applies to the needs of AC is a step toward establishing it as a comprehensive health care goal and toward developing care provider guidelines for its promotion.<h4>Practice implications</h4>Given the attributes of HF in AC, nurses can consider HF as an ultimate nursing care outcome and should focus on goals of care beyond disease treatment and symptoms mitigation when providing care for this population. Holistic, individualized assessment, timely care during each phase of treatment, and developmentally tailored intervention should be provided.
Authors
Cho, E; Baker-Ward, LE; Smith, SK; Barfield, RC; Docherty, SL
MLA Citation
Cho, Eunji, et al. “Human flourishing in adolescents with cancer: Experiences of pediatric oncology health care professionals.Journal of Pediatric Nursing, vol. 59, Jan. 2021, pp. 10–18. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.pedn.2020.12.012.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1470665
PMID
33406441
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Nursing
Volume
59
Published Date
Start Page
10
End Page
18
DOI
10.1016/j.pedn.2020.12.012

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Survivorship, Version 2.2020.

The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for consequences of adult-onset cancer and its treatment, with the goal of helping healthcare professionals who work with survivors, including those in primary care. The guidelines also provide recommendations to help clinicians promote physical activity, weight management, and proper immunizations in survivors and facilitate care coordination to ensure that all of the survivors' needs are addressed. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize additions and changes made to the guidelines in 2020 regarding cardiovascular disease risk assessment and screening for subsequent primary malignancies.
Authors
Denlinger, CS; Sanft, T; Moslehi, JJ; Overholser, L; Armenian, S; Baker, KS; Broderick, G; Demark-Wahnefried, W; Friedman, DL; Goldman, M; Henry, NL; Hill-Kayser, C; Hudson, M; Khakpour, N; Koura, D; McDonough, AL; Melisko, M; Mooney, K; Moore, HCF; Moryl, N; O'Connor, T; Paskett, ED; Patel, C; Peterson, L; Pirl, W; Rodriguez, MA; Ruddy, KJ; Shockney, L; Smith, S; Syrjala, KL; Tevaarwerk, A; Zee, P; McMillian, NR; Freedman-Cass, DA
MLA Citation
Denlinger, Crystal S., et al. “NCCN Guidelines Insights: Survivorship, Version 2.2020.Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : Jnccn, vol. 18, no. 8, Aug. 2020, pp. 1016–23. Epmc, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2020.0037.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1453872
PMID
32755975
Source
epmc
Published In
Jnccn Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
1016
End Page
1023
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2020.0037

Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer survivors: A population-based study.

<h4>Objective</h4>This cross-sectional study examined the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and identified the predictive factors associated with PTSD symptoms in a population of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) survivors.<h4>Methods</h4>A random sample of 2,000 NMIBC survivors, identified through the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry, were sent postal mail survey. PTSD symptoms were measured using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Descriptive statistics and hierarchical multiple linear regression were used to examine the prevalence of PTSD and to identify the factors associated with PTSD.<h4>Results</h4>A total of 376 participants were included in the analysis. The average PCL-5 score was 7.1 (standard deviation [SD] = 10.9, range: 0-66), where higher scores represent higher levels of PTSD symptoms. The prevalence of the provisional PTSD diagnosis was 5.3% or 6.9% (after adjusting for nonresponse). In addition, 28.7% of participants met criteria for at least one PTSD symptom cluster. After controlling for other variables, participants who were younger, had active disease or unsure of status, had more comorbidities, had lower social support, and had higher cognitive concerns reported significantly higher PTSD symptoms.<h4>Conclusion</h4>More than one-fourth of NMIBC survivors had PTSD symptoms. Thus, healthcare providers should assess PTSD symptoms and provide supportive care for NMIBC survivors in the survivorship phase of care.
Authors
Jung, A; Crandell, JL; Nielsen, ME; Mayer, DK; Smith, SK
MLA Citation
Jung, Ahrang, et al. “Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer survivors: A population-based study.Urologic Oncology, vol. 39, no. 4, Apr. 2021, pp. 237.e7-237.e14. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.urolonc.2020.11.033.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1468860
PMID
33308978
Source
epmc
Published In
Urologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations
Volume
39
Published Date
Start Page
237.e7
End Page
237.e14
DOI
10.1016/j.urolonc.2020.11.033

A Qualitative Study of the Experiences of Living With Multiple Myeloma.

PURPOSE: To explore the ways in which multiple myeloma affects an individual's life in the modern treatment era. PARTICIPANTS &AMP; SETTING: 15 individuals with multiple myeloma and 10 clinicians were recruited from two academic medical centers in the southeastern United States. METHODOLOGIC APPROACH: Semistructured interviews were conducted with individuals with multiple myeloma and clinicians to explore the effect of a multiple myeloma diagnosis and treatment on individuals' lives. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using conventional content analysis. FINDINGS: The following four themes emerged from the analysis. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: The treatment journey for those with multiple myeloma can be lifelong and may require frequent visits to an oncologist and, potentially, many successive lines of therapy. Life effects are far-reaching and long-term. Nurses should be aware of the interprofessional resources to help meet these individuals' needs. With thorough assessment, care planning, and education, nurses can play a key role in mitigating the negative effects of multiple myeloma and its treatment.
Authors
LeBlanc, MR; LeBlanc, TW; Leak Bryant, A; Pollak, KI; Bailey, DE; Smith, SK
MLA Citation
LeBlanc, Matthew R., et al. “A Qualitative Study of the Experiences of Living With Multiple Myeloma.Oncol Nurs Forum, vol. 48, no. 2, Mar. 2021, pp. 151–60. Pubmed, doi:10.1188/21.ONF.151-160.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1474463
PMID
33600390
Source
pubmed
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
48
Published Date
Start Page
151
End Page
160
DOI
10.1188/21.ONF.151-160

Quality of Life and Impact of Cancer: Differences in Rural and Nonrural Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Survivors.

<h4>Purpose</h4>People living in rural areas experience greater health disparities than their nonrural counterparts, but little is known about the association between rural status and quality of life (QOL) in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) survivors. We compared self-reported quality of life and impact of cancer in rural and nonrural NHL survivors.<h4>Methods</h4>This study is a secondary analysis of 566 NHL cancer survivors recruited from cancer registries at 2 large academic medical centers in 1 state. Standardized measures collected information on demographics and clinical characteristics, quality of life (QOL; SF-36), and the Impact of Cancer (IOCv2). Rural residence was determined by Rural-Urban Commuting Area (RUCA) codes designated as nonmetropolitan. Multiple linear regression analysis, adjusted for demographic and clinical covariates, was used to evaluate the relationship between rural residence and QOL and impact of cancer.<h4>Findings</h4>Among the 566 participants (83% response rate), rural residence was independently associated with lower SF-36 physical component summary scores and the physical function subscale (all P < .05). Rural residence was also associated with higher IOCv2 positive impact scores and the subscales of altruism/empathy and meaning of cancer scores in the adjusted models (all P < .05).<h4>Conclusions</h4>Given documented rural cancer disparities and the lack of resources in rural communities, study findings support the continued need to provide supportive care to rural cancer survivors to improve their QOL. Consistent with previous research, rural residence status is associated with increased positive impact following cancer diagnosis.
Authors
Noonan, D; LeBlanc, M; Conley, C; Benecha, H; Leak-Bryant, A; Peter, K; Zimmerman, S; Mayer, D; Smith, S
MLA Citation
Noonan, Devon, et al. “Quality of Life and Impact of Cancer: Differences in Rural and Nonrural Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Survivors.The Journal of Rural Health : Official Journal of the American Rural Health Association and the National Rural Health Care Association, vol. 36, no. 4, Sept. 2020, pp. 536–42. Epmc, doi:10.1111/jrh.12420.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1444195
PMID
32472708
Source
epmc
Published In
The Journal of Rural Health : Official Journal of the American Rural Health Association and the National Rural Health Care Association
Volume
36
Published Date
Start Page
536
End Page
542
DOI
10.1111/jrh.12420

Research Areas:

Cancer
Cancer Survivors
Cancer--Patients
Palliative Care
Palliative treatment
Social Work
Technology--Information services
Telemedicine