Allen Song

Overview:

The research in our lab is concerned with advancing structural and functional MRI methodologies (e.g. fast and high-resolution imaging techniques) for human brain imaging. We also aim to improve our understanding of functional brain signals, including spatiotemporal characterizations of the blood oxygenation level dependent contrast and alternative contrast mechanisms that are more directly linked to the neuronal activities. Additional effort is invested in applying and validating the developed methods to study human functional neuroanatomy.

Positions:

Professor in Radiology

Radiology
School of Medicine

Director of the Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis

Duke-UNC Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis
School of Medicine

Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
School of Medicine

Professor in Neurobiology

Neurobiology
School of Medicine

Faculty Network Member of the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences

Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 1995

Medical College of Wisconsin

Visiting Fellow, Laboratory Of Brain And Cognition

National Institutes of Health

Assistant Professor of Radiology, Tenure Track, Radiology

Emory University

Grants:

High Fidelity Diffusion MRI for Children with Cerebral Palsy in Stem Cell Therapy

Administered By
Duke-UNC Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Role of cannabis on HIV-related cognitive impairment: a brain connectomics study

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Addiction
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Neuroimaging of Visual Attention in Aging

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Geriatric Behavioral Health
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

MRI data fusion to investigate effects of drug abuse on HIV neurological complications

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Addiction
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

NCANDA Research Project Site: Duke

Administered By
Psychiatry, Child & Family Mental Health & Developmental Neuroscience
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Frontal Hypoactivation During a Working Memory Task in Children With 22q11 Deletion Syndrome.

Impairments in executive function, such as working memory, are almost universal in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Delineating the neural underpinnings of these functions would enhance understanding of these impairments. In this study, children and adolescents with 22q11 deletion syndrome were compared with healthy control participants in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of working memory. When the 2-back condition was contrasted with the 1-back and 0-back conditions, the participants with 22q11 deletion syndrome showed lower activation in several brain areas involved in working memory-notably dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, and precuneus. This hypoactivation may be due to reduced gray matter volumes or white matter connectivity in the frontal and parietal regions, differences that have previously been documented in children with 22q11 deletion syndrome. Understanding differences in brain function will provide a foundation for future interventions to address the wide range of neurodevelopmental deficits observed in 22q11 deletion syndrome.
Authors
Harrell, W; Zou, L; Englander, Z; Hooper, SR; Keshavan, MS; Song, A; Shashi, V
MLA Citation
Harrell, Waverly, et al. “Frontal Hypoactivation During a Working Memory Task in Children With 22q11 Deletion Syndrome..” J Child Neurol, vol. 32, no. 1, Jan. 2017, pp. 94–99. Pubmed, doi:10.1177/0883073816670813.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1147469
PMID
27702912
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Child Neurol
Volume
32
Published Date
Start Page
94
End Page
99
DOI
10.1177/0883073816670813

Cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortical gray matter in vivo.

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is typically used to study white matter fiber pathways, but may also be valuable to assess the microstructure of cortical gray matter. Although cortical diffusion anisotropy has previously been observed in vivo, its cortical depth dependence has mostly been examined in high-resolution ex vivo studies. This study thus aims to investigate the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo on a clinical 3 T scanner. Specifically, a novel multishot constant-density spiral DTI technique with inherent correction of motion-induced phase errors was used to achieve a high spatial resolution (0.625 × 0.625 × 3 mm) and high spatial fidelity with no scan time penalty. The results show: (i) a diffusion anisotropy in the cortical gray matter, with a primarily radial diffusion orientation, as observed in previous ex vivo and in vivo studies, and (ii) a cortical depth dependence of the fractional anisotropy, with consistently higher values in the middle cortical lamina than in the deep and superficial cortical laminae, as observed in previous ex vivo studies. These results, which are consistent across subjects, demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for investigating the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo.
Authors
Truong, T-K; Guidon, A; Song, AW
MLA Citation
Truong, Trong-Kha, et al. “Cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortical gray matter in vivo..” Plos One, vol. 9, no. 3, 2014. Pubmed, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0091424.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1024630
PMID
24608869
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plos One
Volume
9
Published Date
Start Page
e91424
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0091424

Apparent diffusion coefficient dependent fMRI: Spatiotemporal characteristics and implications on calibrated fMRI

In this manuscript, we review the development of an alternative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) contrast mechanism based on the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), in light of the recent progress in other complementary functional imaging contrasts sensitive to cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Specifically, we discuss the spatial and temporal characteristics of ADC fMRI in localizing neuronal activities, and also draw inference on its potential applicability to achieve fast calibrated fMRI. We found that optimized dynamic ADC contrast can lead to improved spatial localization in small vessel networks close to the true neuronal activities, while having the potential to simultaneously generate the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) and CBF/CBV contrasts required in a calibrated fMRI experiment. With sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and temporal resolution, fMRI based on the dynamic ADC contrast may prove to be an efficient technique to achieve accurate and quantitative measures of neuronal activities. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Authors
Song, AW; Truong, TK
MLA Citation
Song, A. W., and T. K. Truong. “Apparent diffusion coefficient dependent fMRI: Spatiotemporal characteristics and implications on calibrated fMRI.” International Journal of Imaging Systems and Technology, vol. 20, no. 1, Mar. 2010, pp. 42–50. Scopus, doi:10.1002/ima.20220.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub799553
Source
scopus
Published In
International Journal of Imaging Systems and Technology
Volume
20
Published Date
Start Page
42
End Page
50
DOI
10.1002/ima.20220

Single-shot ADC imaging for fMRI.

It has been suggested that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) contrast can be sensitive to cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes during brain activation. However, current ADC imaging techniques have an inherently low temporal resolution due to the requirement of multiple acquisitions with different b-factors, as well as potential confounds from cross talk between the deoxyhemoglobin-induced background gradients and the externally applied diffusion-weighting gradients. In this report a new method is proposed and implemented that addresses these two limitations. Specifically, a single-shot pulse sequence that sequentially acquires one gradient-echo (GRE) and two diffusion-weighted spin-echo (SE) images was developed. In addition, the diffusion-weighting gradient waveform was numerically optimized to null the cross terms with the deoxyhemoglobin-induced background gradients to fully isolate the effect of diffusion weighting from that of oxygenation-level changes. The experimental results show that this new single-shot method can acquire ADC maps with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and establish its practical utility in functional MRI (fMRI) to complement the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) technique and provide differential sensitivity for different vasculatures to better localize neural activity originating from the small vessels.
Authors
Song, AW; Guo, H; Truong, T-K
MLA Citation
Song, Allen W., et al. “Single-shot ADC imaging for fMRI..” Magn Reson Med, vol. 57, no. 2, Feb. 2007, pp. 417–22. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/mrm.21135.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub736836
PMID
17260372
Source
pubmed
Published In
Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume
57
Published Date
Start Page
417
End Page
422
DOI
10.1002/mrm.21135

Functional parcellation of attentional control regions of the brain.

Recently, a number of investigators have examined the neural loci of psychological processes enabling the control of visual spatial attention using cued-attention paradigms in combination with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. Findings from these studies have provided strong evidence for the involvement of a fronto-parietal network in attentional control. In the present study, we build upon this previous work to further investigate these attentional control systems. In particular, we employed additional controls for nonattentional sensory and interpretative aspects of cue processing to determine whether distinct regions in the fronto-parietal network are involved in different aspects of cue processing, such as cue-symbol interpretation and attentional orienting. In addition, we used shorter cue-target intervals that were closer to those used in the behavioral and event-related potential cueing literatures. Twenty participants performed a cued spatial attention task while brain activity was recorded with functional magnetic resonance imaging. We found functional specialization for different aspects of cue processing in the lateral and medial subregions of the frontal and parietal cortex. In particular, the medial subregions were more specific to the orienting of visual spatial attention, while the lateral subregions were associated with more general aspects of cue processing, such as cue-symbol interpretation. Additional cue-related effects included differential activations in midline frontal regions and pretarget enhancements in the thalamus and early visual cortical areas.
Authors
Woldorff, MG; Hazlett, CJ; Fichtenholtz, HM; Weissman, DH; Dale, AM; Song, AW
MLA Citation
Woldorff, Marty G., et al. “Functional parcellation of attentional control regions of the brain..” J Cogn Neurosci, vol. 16, no. 1, Jan. 2004, pp. 149–65. Pubmed, doi:10.1162/089892904322755638.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub722593
PMID
15006044
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume
16
Published Date
Start Page
149
End Page
165
DOI
10.1162/089892904322755638