Kyle Strickland

Overview:

Dr. Strickland specializes in cytopathology and women's and perinatal surgical pathology.  His areas of interest include epithelial and mesenchymal gynecologic neoplasia and fine needle aspiration cytology.

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 2005

College of Charleston

B.A. 2005

College of Charleston

MD./PhD. 2013

Medical University of South Carolina, College of Medicine

Resident, Anatomic Pathology, Harvard Medical School

Brigham and Women's Hospital

Fellow, Cytopathology, Harvard Medical School

Brigham and Women's Hospital

Fellow, Women's and Perinatal Pathology, Harvard Medical School

Brigham and Women's Hospital

Grants:

Population Health Research Support - Study of Pregnancy and Neonatal Health (SPAN) Task A

Administered By
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maternal Fetal Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Faculty Member
Start Date
End Date

Point-of-care cellular and molecular pathology of breast tumors on a cell phone

Administered By
Biomedical Engineering
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Are ESR1 mutations associated with shorter progression free survival in copy number-low endometrial adenocarcinomas?

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
Foundation for Women's Cancer
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

TIME Aim of the Study of Pregnancy and Neonatal Health (SPAN) Task Order A

Administered By
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maternal Fetal Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Faculty Member
Start Date
End Date

Molecular classification of endometrial advanced stage cancers and association with survival outcomes: Ancillary analysis of GOG-0258

Administered By
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gynecologic Oncology
Awarded By
American Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Foundation
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

BAP1 Tumor Predisposition Syndrome Presenting as a Recurrent Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor.

The BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) gene encodes a tumor suppressor that functions as a ubiquitin hydrolase involved in DNA damage repair. BAP1 germline mutations are associated with increased risk of multiple solid malignancies, including mesothelioma, uveal melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and high-grade rhabdoid meningiomas. Here, we describe the case of a 52-yr-old woman who experienced multiple abdominal recurrences of an ovarian sex cord-stromal tumor that was originally diagnosed at age 25 and who was found to have a germline mutation in BAP1 and a family history consistent with BAP1 tumor predisposition syndrome. Recurrence of the sex cord-stromal tumor demonstrated loss of BAP1 expression by immunohistochemistry. Although ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors have been described in mouse models of BAP1 tumor predisposition syndrome, this relationship has not been previously described in humans and warrants further investigation. The case presentation, tumor morphology, and immunohistochemical findings have overlapping characteristics with peritoneal mesotheliomas, and this case represents a potential pitfall for surgical pathologists.
Authors
MLA Citation
Albright, Benjamin B., et al. “BAP1 Tumor Predisposition Syndrome Presenting as a Recurrent Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor.Int J Gynecol Pathol, May 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/PGP.0000000000000855.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1515972
PMID
35348477
Source
pubmed
Published In
Int J Gynecol Pathol
Published Date
DOI
10.1097/PGP.0000000000000855

Single-cell tumor-immune microenvironment of BRCA1/2 mutated high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

The majority of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSCs) are deficient in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair, most commonly due to mutations or hypermethylation of the BRCA1/2 genes. We aimed to discover how BRCA1/2 mutations shape the cellular phenotypes and spatial interactions of the tumor microenvironment. Using a highly multiplex immunofluorescence and image analysis we generate spatial proteomic data for 21 markers in 124,623 single cells from 112 tumor cores originating from 31 tumors with BRCA1/2 mutation (BRCA1/2mut), and from 13 tumors without alterations in HR genes. We identify a phenotypically distinct tumor microenvironment in the BRCA1/2mut tumors with evidence of increased immunosurveillance. Importantly, we report a prognostic role of a proliferative tumor-cell subpopulation, which associates with enhanced spatial tumor-immune interactions by CD8+ and CD4 + T-cells in the BRCA1/2mut tumors. The single-cell spatial landscapes indicate distinct patterns of spatial immunosurveillance with the potential to improve immunotherapeutic strategies and patient stratification in HGSC.
Authors
Launonen, I-M; Lyytikäinen, N; Casado, J; Anttila, EA; Szabó, A; Haltia, U-M; Jacobson, CA; Lin, JR; Maliga, Z; Howitt, BE; Strickland, KC; Santagata, S; Elias, K; D'Andrea, AD; Konstantinopoulos, PA; Sorger, PK; Färkkilä, A
MLA Citation
Launonen, I. .. M., et al. “Single-cell tumor-immune microenvironment of BRCA1/2 mutated high-grade serous ovarian cancer.Nat Commun, vol. 13, no. 1, Feb. 2022, p. 835. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41467-022-28389-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1509784
PMID
35149709
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nature Communications
Volume
13
Published Date
Start Page
835
DOI
10.1038/s41467-022-28389-3

Author Correction: Cellphone enabled point-of-care assessment of breast tumor cytology and molecular HER2 expression from fine-needle aspirates.

Authors
Joh, DY; Heggestad, JT; Zhang, S; Anderson, GR; Bhattacharyya, J; Wardell, SE; Wall, SA; Cheng, AB; Albarghouthi, F; Liu, J; Oshima, S; Hucknall, AM; Hyslop, T; Hall, AHS; Wood, KC; Shelley Hwang, E; Strickland, KC; Wei, Q; Chilkoti, A
MLA Citation
Joh, Daniel Y., et al. “Author Correction: Cellphone enabled point-of-care assessment of breast tumor cytology and molecular HER2 expression from fine-needle aspirates.Npj Breast Cancer, vol. 7, no. 1, Sept. 2021, p. 126. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41523-021-00335-4.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497086
PMID
34535683
Source
pubmed
Published In
Npj Breast Cancer
Volume
7
Published Date
Start Page
126
DOI
10.1038/s41523-021-00335-4

Placental uterine artery embolization followed by delayed hysterectomy for placenta percreta: A case series.

We describe outcomes of patients with suspected placenta percreta treated with placental uterine artery embolization (P-UAE) followed by delayed hysterectomy. This is a prospective case series of subjects from 2005 to 2018 with suspected placenta percreta who underwent P-UAE at the time of cesarean delivery followed by delayed hysterectomy. Both scheduled and unscheduled surgical cases were included. Maternal characteristics, surgical approaches, intra- and postoperative outcomes were abstracted from medical records. In total, twenty-two subjects were included. Median (interquartile range, IQR) delivery gestational age was 34.6 (31.9, 35.7) weeks, occurring as scheduled in 17 (77.3%) subjects and unscheduled in 5 (22.7%). Delayed hysterectomy was performed as scheduled in 17 (77.3%) subjects at a median (IQR) 40.5 (38.0, 44.0) days after delivery, and 5 (22.7%) subjects had a hysterectomy prior to scheduled date, median (IQR) 27.0 (17.0, 35.0) days after delivery. Indications for the 5 unscheduled hysterectomies included bleeding (n = 3) and suspected endometritis (n = 2). Three subjects (13.6%) received a blood transfusion (1, 3, 3 units) during delivery, and 7 (31.8%) were transfused during delayed hysterectomy (median [IQR] 2 [1,3] units). Three (13.6%) subjects had bladder resection at the time of hysterectomy; 1 (4.5%) had an unintentional cystotomy and 1 (4.5%) had a ureteral injury. P-UAE followed by delayed hysterectomy appears to be a safe and feasible, although appropriate patient selection and close surveillance are imperative, as 22.7% of patients underwent unscheduled hysterectomy.
Authors
Gatta, LA; Lee, PS; Gilner, JB; Weber, JM; Adkins, L; Salinaro, JR; Habib, AS; Pabon-Ramos, W; Strickland, KC; Ronald, J; Erkanli, A; Mehdiratta, JE; Grotegut, CA; Secord, AA
MLA Citation
Gatta, Luke A., et al. “Placental uterine artery embolization followed by delayed hysterectomy for placenta percreta: A case series.Gynecol Oncol Rep, vol. 37, Aug. 2021, p. 100833. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.gore.2021.100833.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1493074
PMID
34368412
Source
pubmed
Published In
Gynecologic Oncology Reports
Volume
37
Published Date
Start Page
100833
DOI
10.1016/j.gore.2021.100833

Cellphone enabled point-of-care assessment of breast tumor cytology and molecular HER2 expression from fine-needle aspirates.

Management of breast cancer in limited-resource settings is hindered by a lack of low-cost, logistically sustainable approaches toward molecular and cellular diagnostic pathology services that are needed to guide therapy. To address these limitations, we have developed a multimodal cellphone-based platform-the EpiView-D4-that can evaluate both cellular morphology and molecular expression of clinically relevant biomarkers directly from fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of breast tissue specimens within 1 h. The EpiView-D4 is comprised of two components: (1) an immunodiagnostic chip built upon a "non-fouling" polymer brush-coating (the "D4") which quantifies expression of protein biomarkers directly from crude cell lysates, and (2) a custom cellphone-based optical microscope ("EpiView") designed for imaging cytology preparations and D4 assay readout. As a proof-of-concept, we used the EpiView-D4 for assessment of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) expression and validated the performance using cancer cell lines, animal models, and human tissue specimens. We found that FNA cytology specimens (prepared in less than 5 min with rapid staining kits) imaged by the EpiView-D4 were adequate for assessment of lesional cellularity and tumor content. We also found our device could reliably distinguish between HER2 expression levels across multiple different cell lines and animal xenografts. In a pilot study with human tissue (n = 19), we were able to accurately categorize HER2-negative and HER2-positve tumors from FNA specimens. Taken together, the EpiView-D4 offers a promising alternative to invasive-and often unavailable-pathology services and may enable the democratization of effective breast cancer management in limited-resource settings.
Authors
Joh, DY; Heggestad, JT; Zhang, S; Anderson, GR; Bhattacharyya, J; Wardell, SE; Wall, SA; Cheng, AB; Albarghouthi, F; Liu, J; Oshima, S; Hucknall, AM; Hyslop, T; Hall, AHS; Wood, KC; Shelley Hwang, E; Strickland, KC; Wei, Q; Chilkoti, A
MLA Citation
Joh, Daniel Y., et al. “Cellphone enabled point-of-care assessment of breast tumor cytology and molecular HER2 expression from fine-needle aspirates.Npj Breast Cancer, vol. 7, no. 1, July 2021, p. 85. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41523-021-00290-0.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1487266
PMID
34215753
Source
pubmed
Published In
Npj Breast Cancer
Volume
7
Published Date
Start Page
85
DOI
10.1038/s41523-021-00290-0