Gita Suneja

Positions:

Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology

Radiation Oncology
School of Medicine

Associate Research Professor of Global Health

Duke Global Health Institute
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2008

Brown University

Intern, Internal Medicine

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Resident, Radiation Oncology

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Chief Resident, Radiation Oncology

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Clinical Instructor, Radiationoncology

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology

University of Utah School of Medicine

Grants:

Publications:

Anaplastic meningioma: an analysis of the National Cancer Database from 2004 to 2012.

OBJECTIVE Anaplastic meningiomas represent 1%-2% of meningioma diagnoses and portend a poor prognosis. Limited information is available on practice patterns and optimal management. The purpose of this study was to define treatment patterns and outcomes by treatment modality using a large national cancer registry. METHODS The National Cancer Database was used to identify patients diagnosed with anaplastic meningioma from 2004 to 2012. Log-rank statistics were used to compare survival outcomes by extent of resection, use of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT), and use of adjuvant chemotherapy. Least-squares linear regression was used to evaluate the utilization of RT over time. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify predictors of receipt of RT. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the effect of RT, gross-total resection (GTR), and chemotherapy on survival. RESULTS A total of 755 adults with anaplastic meningioma were identified. The 5-year overall survival rate was 41.4%. Fifty-two percent of patients received RT, 7% received chemotherapy, and 58% underwent GTR. Older patients were less likely to receive RT (OR 0.98, p < 0.01). Older age (HR 1.04, p < 0.01), high comorbidity score (HR 1.33, p = 0.02), and subtotal resection (HR 1.57, p = 0.02) were associated with increased risk of death on multivariate modeling, while RT receipt was associated with decreased risk of death (HR 0.79, p = 0.04). Chemotherapy did not have a demonstrable effect on survival (HR 1.33, p = 0.18). CONCLUSIONS Anaplastic meningioma portends a poor prognosis. Gross-total resection and RT are associated with improved survival, but utilization of RT is low. Unless medically contraindicated, patients with anaplastic meningioma should be offered RT.
Authors
Orton, A; Frandsen, J; Jensen, R; Shrieve, DC; Suneja, G
MLA Citation
Orton, Andrew, et al. “Anaplastic meningioma: an analysis of the National Cancer Database from 2004 to 2012..” J Neurosurg, vol. 128, no. 6, June 2018, pp. 1684–89. Pubmed, doi:10.3171/2017.2.JNS162282.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1265987
PMID
28731397
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Neurosurg
Volume
128
Published Date
Start Page
1684
End Page
1689
DOI
10.3171/2017.2.JNS162282

Trends in Global Health Abstracts at ASTRO 2012 to 2016

Authors
Martella, A; Daley, LA; Monu, N; Olson, AC; Chino, JP; Suneja, G
MLA Citation
Martella, A., et al. “Trends in Global Health Abstracts at ASTRO 2012 to 2016.” International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, vol. 99, no. 2, Elsevier BV, 2017, pp. E406–E406. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2017.06.1575.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1284421
Source
crossref
Published In
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Volume
99
Published Date
Start Page
E406
End Page
E406
DOI
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2017.06.1575

Disparities in cancer treatment among patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.

BACKGROUND: Patients with cancer who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are less likely to receive cancer treatment compared with HIV-uninfected individuals. However, to the authors' knowledge, the impact of insurance status and comorbidities is unknown. METHODS: Data from the National Cancer Data Base were used to study nonelderly adults diagnosed with several common cancers from 2003 to 2011. Cancer treatment was defined as chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy, or any combination during the first course of treatment. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between HIV status and lack of cancer treatment, and identify predictors for lack of treatment among HIV-infected patients. RESULTS: A total of 10,265 HIV-infected and 2,219,232 HIV-uninfected cases were included. In multivariate analysis, HIV-infected patients with cancer were found to be more likely to lack cancer treatment for cancers of the head and neck (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.09-2.01), upper gastrointestinal tract (aOR, 2.62; 95% CI, 2.04-3.37), colorectum (aOR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.17-2.48), lung (aOR, 2.46; 95% CI, 2.19-2.76), breast (aOR, 2.14; 95% CI, 1.16-3.98), cervix (aOR, 2.81; 95% CI, 1.77-4.45), prostate (aOR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.69-2.76), Hodgkin lymphoma (aOR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.66-2.22), and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (aOR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.65-2.00). Predictors of a lack of cancer treatment among HIV-infected individuals varied by tumor type (solid tumor vs lymphoma), but black race and a lack of private insurance were found to be predictors for both groups. CONCLUSIONS: In the United States, HIV-infected patients with cancer appear to be less likely to receive cancer treatment regardless of insurance and comorbidities. To the authors' knowledge, the current study is the largest study of cancer treatment in HIV-infected patients with cancer in the United States and provides evidence of cancer treatment disparities even after controlling for differences with regard to insurance status and comorbidities. Further work should focus on addressing differential cancer treatment. Cancer 2016;122:2399-2407. © 2016 American Cancer Society.
Authors
Suneja, G; Lin, CC; Simard, EP; Han, X; Engels, EA; Jemal, A
MLA Citation
Suneja, Gita, et al. “Disparities in cancer treatment among patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus..” Cancer, vol. 122, no. 15, Aug. 2016, pp. 2399–407. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.30052.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1144283
PMID
27187086
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
122
Published Date
Start Page
2399
End Page
2407
DOI
10.1002/cncr.30052

Local Recurrence and Ocular Adnexal Complications Following Electronic Surface Brachytherapy for Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lower Eyelid.

IMPORTANCE: Various treatment options exist for nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including topical agents, surgery, or definitive or adjuvant radiation therapy. Recently, electronic surface brachytherapy (ESB) has been described as a noninvasive option for NMSC. We report a case of local recurrence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and ocular complications following ESB to the lower eyelid. OBSERVATIONS: A man in his 60s presented with a recurrent BCC within the radiation field 10 months after undergoing ESB for a biopsy-proven BCC. In addition to the recurrence, he had contracture of the conjunctiva in the socket of his previously enucleated eye, as well as lower eyelid ectropion, resulting in displacement and loss of retention of his ocular prosthesis. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Electronic surface brachytherapy should be used with caution, particularly in the periocular region because the late effects of hypofractionated radiation may cause ocular and orbital complications. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of ocular complications with this modality. This case highlights a local recurrence following use of this new treatment modality, suggesting further investigation is warranted to determine the safety and efficacy of ESB.
Authors
Eftekhari, K; Anderson, RL; Suneja, G; Bowen, A; Oberg, TJ; Bowen, GM
MLA Citation
Eftekhari, Kian, et al. “Local Recurrence and Ocular Adnexal Complications Following Electronic Surface Brachytherapy for Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lower Eyelid..” Jama Dermatol, vol. 151, no. 9, Sept. 2015, pp. 1002–04. Pubmed, doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.2613.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1144291
PMID
26267892
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jama Dermatol
Volume
151
Published Date
Start Page
1002
End Page
1004
DOI
10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.2613

Cancer in Botswana: resources and opportunities.

Authors
Suneja, G; Ramogola-Masire, D; Medhin, HG; Dryden-Peterson, S; Bekelman, JE
MLA Citation
Suneja, Gita, et al. “Cancer in Botswana: resources and opportunities..” Lancet Oncol, vol. 14, no. 8, July 2013, pp. e290–91. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/S1470-2045(13)70283-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1144302
PMID
23816293
Source
pubmed
Published In
Lancet Oncol
Volume
14
Published Date
Start Page
e290
End Page
e291
DOI
10.1016/S1470-2045(13)70283-3