Linda Sutton

Overview:

Clinical

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Medical Director, Duke Oncology Consortium

Medicine
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1987

U Mass Memorial Medical Center

Resident, Internal Medicine

Montefiore Medical Center

Fellowship, Hematology/ Oncology

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

NCI National Clinical Trials Network (UG1)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Improving Adherence to Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Self-Management Intervention for Women with Breast Cancer and Diabetes

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Caregiver-Assisting Coping Skills Training for Lung Cancer

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Spouse Guided Pain Management Training for Cancer Pain

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Coping Skills Training and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Symptom Management: Feasibility and Acceptability of a Brief Telephone-Delivered Protocol for Patients With Advanced Cancer.

CONTEXT: Patients with advanced cancer face a life-limiting condition that brings a high symptom burden that often includes pain, fatigue, and psychological distress. Psychosocial interventions have promise for managing symptoms but need additional tailoring for these patients' specific needs. Patients with advanced cancer in the community also face persistent barriers-availability of interventions in community clinics as well as financial and illness-related factors-to accessing psychosocial interventions. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of telephone implementation of Engage, a novel brief combined Coping Skills Training and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy protocol, for reducing symptoms and increasing quality of life in community patients with advanced cancer. METHODS: Adult patients with advanced cancer receiving care in the community received Engage, four 60-minute manualized telephone sessions delivered by a trained psychotherapist and completed pretreatment and post-treatment assessments. RESULTS: Engage was feasible, achieving 100% accrual (N = 24) of a heterogeneous sample of patients with advanced cancer, with good retention (88% completed). Acceptability was demonstrated via satisfaction (mean 29 of 32; SD 2), engagement (95% attendance), and use of skills. Secondary analyses pointed to reductions in pain interference, fatigue, psychological distress, and improvements in psychological acceptance and engagement in value-guided activity after treatment. CONCLUSION: Engage, our brief novel combined Coping Skills and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy intervention, demonstrated initial feasibility and acceptability when delivered over the telephone and increased access for community clinic patients with advanced cancer. Future research will assess the comparative efficacy of Engage in larger randomized trials.
Authors
Plumb Vilardaga, JC; Winger, JG; Teo, I; Owen, L; Sutton, LM; Keefe, FJ; Somers, TJ
MLA Citation
Plumb Vilardaga, Jennifer C., et al. “Coping Skills Training and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Symptom Management: Feasibility and Acceptability of a Brief Telephone-Delivered Protocol for Patients With Advanced Cancer..” J Pain Symptom Manage, Sept. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2019.09.005.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1411901
PMID
31539599
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Pain Symptom Manage
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2019.09.005

Randomized Trial of Standard Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens Versus Capecitabine in Older Women With Early Breast Cancer: 10-Year Update of the CALGB 49907 Trial.

PURPOSE: Older women with breast cancer remain under-represented in clinical trials. The Cancer and Leukemia Group B 49907 trial focused on women age 65 years and older. We previously reported the primary analysis after a median follow-up of 2.4 years. Standard adjuvant chemotherapy showed significant improvements in recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival compared with capecitabine. We now update results at a median follow-up of 11.4 years. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients age 65 years or older with early breast cancer were randomly assigned to either standard adjuvant chemotherapy (physician's choice of either cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil or cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin) or capecitabine. An adaptive Bayesian design was used to determine sample size and test noninferiority of capecitabine. The primary end point was RFS. RESULTS: The design stopped accrual with 633 patients at its first sample size assessment. RFS remains significantly longer for patients treated with standard chemotherapy. At 10 years, in patients treated with standard chemotherapy versus capecitabine, the RFS rates were 56% and 50%, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 0.80; P = .03); breast cancer-specific survival rates were 88% and 82%, respectively (HR, 0.62; P = .03); and overall survival rates were 62% and 56%, respectively (HR, 0.84; P = .16). With longer follow-up, standard chemotherapy remains superior to capecitabine among hormone receptor-negative patients (HR, 0.66; P = .02), but not among hormone receptor-positive patients (HR, 0.89; P = .43). Overall, 43.9% of patients have died (13.1% from breast cancer, 16.4% from causes other than breast cancer, and 14.1% from unknown causes). Second nonbreast cancers occurred in 14.1% of patients. CONCLUSION: With longer follow-up, RFS remains superior for standard adjuvant chemotherapy versus capecitabine, especially in patients with hormone receptor-negative disease. Competing risks in this older population dilute overall survival benefits.
Authors
Muss, HB; Polley, M-YC; Berry, DA; Liu, H; Cirrincione, CT; Theodoulou, M; Mauer, AM; Kornblith, AB; Partridge, AH; Dressler, LG; Cohen, HJ; Kartcheske, PA; Perez, EA; Wolff, AC; Gralow, JR; Burstein, HJ; Mahmood, AA; Sutton, LM; Magrinat, G; Parker, BA; Hart, RD; Grenier, D; Hurria, A; Jatoi, A; Norton, L; Hudis, CA; Winer, EP; Carey, L
MLA Citation
Muss, Hyman B., et al. “Randomized Trial of Standard Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens Versus Capecitabine in Older Women With Early Breast Cancer: 10-Year Update of the CALGB 49907 Trial..” J Clin Oncol, vol. 37, no. 26, Sept. 2019, pp. 2338–48. Pubmed, doi:10.1200/JCO.19.00647.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1402479
PMID
31339827
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
37
Published Date
Start Page
2338
End Page
2348
DOI
10.1200/JCO.19.00647

Palliative care. Clinical practice guidelines in oncology.

Authors
Levy, MH; Back, A; Bazargan, S; Benedetti, C; Billings, JA; Block, S; Bruera, E; Carducci, MA; Dy, S; Eberle, C; Foley, KM; Harris, J-D; Knight, SJ; Milch, R; Rhiner, M; Slatkin, NE; Spiegel, D; Sutton, L; Urba, S; Von Roenn, JH; Weinstein, SM; National Comprehensive Cancer Network,
MLA Citation
Levy, Michael H., et al. “Palliative care. Clinical practice guidelines in oncology..” J Natl Compr Canc Netw, vol. 4, no. 8, Sept. 2006, pp. 776–818. Pubmed, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2006.0068.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub801318
PMID
16948956
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jnccn Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Volume
4
Published Date
Start Page
776
End Page
818
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2006.0068

Development and pilot testing of an mHealth behavioral cancer pain protocol for medically underserved communities

© 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. The purpose of this study was to refine and test a mobile-health behavioral cancer pain coping skills training protocol for women with breast cancer and pain from medically underserved areas. Three focus groups (Phase 1) were used to refine the initial protocol. A single-arm pilot trial (Phase 2) was conducted to assess feasibility, acceptability, and changes in outcomes. The intervention was delivered at a community-based clinic via videoconferencing technology. Participants were women (N = 19 for Phase 1 and N = 20 for Phase 2) with breast cancer and pain in medically underserved areas. Major themes from focus groups were used to refine the intervention. The refined intervention demonstrated feasibility and acceptability. Participants reported significant improvement in pain severity, pain interference, and self-efficacy for pain management. Our intervention is feasible, acceptable, and likely to lead to improvement in pain-related outcomes for breast cancer patients in medically underserved areas. Implications for Psychosocial Oncology Practice Breast cancer patients being treated in medically underserved areas have a dearth of exposure to behavioral interventions that may improve their ability to manage pain. Evidence from this single-arm pilot trial suggests that our mobile-health behavioral cancer pain coping skills training protocol is acceptable and feasible in this vulnerable population. Appropriately adapted mobile-health technologies may provide an avenue to reach underserved patients and implement behavioral interventions to improve pain management.
Authors
Dorfman, CS; Kelleher, SA; Winger, JG; Shelby, RA; Thorn, BE; Sutton, LM; Keefe, FJ; Gandhi, V; Manohar, P; Somers, TJ
MLA Citation
Dorfman, C. S., et al. “Development and pilot testing of an mHealth behavioral cancer pain protocol for medically underserved communities.” Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, vol. 37, no. 3, 2019, pp. 335–49. Scopus, doi:10.1080/07347332.2018.1479327.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1253178
Source
scopus
Published In
Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Volume
37
Published Date
Start Page
335
End Page
349
DOI
10.1080/07347332.2018.1479327

Partner-guided cancer pain management at the end of life: a preliminary study.

This preliminary study tested the efficacy of a partner-guided cancer pain management protocol for patients who are at the end of life. Seventy-eight advanced cancer patients meeting criteria for hospice eligibility and their partners were randomly assigned to a partner-guided pain management training intervention, or usual care control condition. The partner-guided pain management training protocol was a three-session intervention conducted in patients' homes that integrated educational information about cancer pain with systematic training of patients and partners in cognitive and behavioral pain coping skills. Data analyses revealed that the partner-guided pain management protocol produced significant increases in partners' ratings of their self-efficacy for helping the patient control pain and self-efficacy for controlling other symptoms. Partners receiving this training also showed a trend to report improvements in their levels of caregiver strain. Overall, the results of this preliminary study suggest that a partner-guided pain management protocol may have benefits in the context of cancer pain at the end of life. Given the significance of pain at the end of life, future research in this area appears warranted.
Authors
Keefe, FJ; Ahles, TA; Sutton, L; Dalton, J; Baucom, D; Pope, MS; Knowles, V; McKinstry, E; Furstenberg, C; Syrjala, K; Waters, SJ; McKee, D; McBride, C; Rumble, M; Scipio, C
MLA Citation
Keefe, Francis J., et al. “Partner-guided cancer pain management at the end of life: a preliminary study..” J Pain Symptom Manage, vol. 29, no. 3, Mar. 2005, pp. 263–72. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2004.06.014.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub659769
PMID
15781177
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume
29
Published Date
Start Page
263
End Page
272
DOI
10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2004.06.014