Eric Thompson

Overview:

My translational and clinical research focus is pediatric brain tumors. My lab investigates 1) the mechanism of oncolytic viral immunotherapy for the treatment of solid tumor and disseminated medulloblastoma, and 2) the role of Abelson family kinases (ABL1 and ABL2) in the promotion of leptomeningeal dissemination of pediatric brain tumors.

My clinical research focuses on 1) using a novel peptide vaccine to target CMV antigens to treat children with recurrent medulloblastoma and malignant glioma and 2) using oncolytic poliovirus to treat children with recurrent malignant glioma.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Assistant Professor in Pediatrics

Pediatrics
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 2002

Duke University

M.D. 2006

University of Nebraska, College of Medicine

Neurological Surgery Resident, Neurosurgery

Oregon Health and Science University

Pediatric Neurological Surgery Fellow, Neurosurgery

The Hospital For Sick Children

Grants:

The Role of CD155 in Leptomeningeal Dissemination and Oncolytic Virus Susceptibility in the Medulloblastoma Microenvironment

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Department of Defense
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase-1 clinical trial of PVSRIPO oncolytic immunotherapy in pediatric HGG

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Solving Kids' Cancer
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase Ib study of Oncolytic Polio/Rhinovirus Recombinant Against Recurrent Malignant Glioma in Children

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Istari Oncology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

ABL Kinases as Drivers of Medulloblastoma Leptomeningeal Dissemination

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
American Society of Pediatric Nephrology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Oncolytic Poliovirus Immunotherapy for Pediatric Medulloblastoma

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Musella Foundation For Brain Tumor Research & Information, Inc
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Magnetic resonance-guided stereotactic laser ablation therapy for the treatment of pediatric brain tumors: a multiinstitutional retrospective study.

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of MR-guided stereotactic laser ablation (SLA) therapy in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors. METHODS: Data from 17 North American centers were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical, technical, and radiographic data for pediatric patients treated with SLA for a diagnosis of brain tumor from 2008 to 2016 were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 86 patients (mean age 12.2 ± 4.5 years) with 76 low-grade (I or II) and 10 high-grade (III or IV) tumors were included. Tumor location included lobar (38.4%), deep (45.3%), and cerebellar (16.3%) compartments. The mean follow-up time was 24 months (median 18 months, range 3-72 months). At the last follow-up, the volume of SLA-treated tumors had decreased in 80.6% of patients with follow-up data. Patients with high-grade tumors were more likely to have an unchanged or larger tumor size after SLA treatment than those with low-grade tumors (OR 7.49, p = 0.0364). Subsequent surgery and adjuvant treatment were not required after SLA treatment in 90.4% and 86.7% of patients, respectively. Patients with high-grade tumors were more likely to receive subsequent surgery (OR 2.25, p = 0.4957) and adjuvant treatment (OR 3.77, p = 0.1711) after SLA therapy, without reaching significance. A total of 29 acute complications in 23 patients were reported and included malpositioned catheters (n = 3), intracranial hemorrhages (n = 2), transient neurological deficits (n = 11), permanent neurological deficits (n = 5), symptomatic perilesional edema (n = 2), hydrocephalus (n = 4), and death (n = 2). On long-term follow-up, 3 patients were reported to have worsened neuropsychological test results. Pre-SLA tumor volume, tumor location, number of laser trajectories, and number of lesions created did not result in a significantly increased risk of complications; however, the odds of complications increased by 14% (OR 1.14, p = 0.0159) with every 1-cm3 increase in the volume of the lesion created. CONCLUSIONS: SLA is an effective, minimally invasive treatment option for pediatric brain tumors, although it is not without risks. Limiting the volume of the generated thermal lesion may help decrease the incidence of complications.
Authors
Arocho-Quinones, EV; Lew, SM; Handler, MH; Tovar-Spinoza, Z; Smyth, M; Bollo, R; Donahue, D; Perry, MS; Levy, ML; Gonda, D; Mangano, FT; Storm, PB; Price, AV; Couture, DE; Oluigbo, C; Duhaime, A-C; Barnett, GH; Muh, CR; Sather, MD; Fallah, A; Wang, AC; Bhatia, S; Patel, K; Tarima, S; Graber, S; Huckins, S; Hafez, DM; Rumalla, K; Bailey, L; Shandley, S; Roach, A; Alexander, E; Jenkins, W; Tsering, D; Price, G; Meola, A; Evanoff, W; Thompson, EM; Brandmeir, N; Pediatric Stereotactic Laser Ablation Workgroup,
MLA Citation
Arocho-Quinones, Elsa V., et al. “Magnetic resonance-guided stereotactic laser ablation therapy for the treatment of pediatric brain tumors: a multiinstitutional retrospective study.J Neurosurg Pediatr, Mar. 2020, pp. 1–9. Pubmed, doi:10.3171/2020.1.PEDS19496.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1435845
PMID
32217793
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Neurosurg Pediatr
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
9
DOI
10.3171/2020.1.PEDS19496

Current medulloblastoma subgroup specific clinical trials.

Medulloblastoma is a heterogeneous disease with at least four distinct molecular subgroups: wingless (WNT), sonic hedgehog (SHH), Group 3, and Group 4. Recently there has been considerable progress defining the molecular drivers and prognostic factors of each subgroup. However, this information has only rarely been used to stratify risk or impact treatment. The purpose of this work is to provide an update on current clinical trials that provide molecularly stratified treatment paradigms. A search was conducted on ClinicalTrials.gov using the following search terms: "medulloblastoma and subgroup", "medulloblastoma and SHH", "medulloblastoma and WNT", and "medulloblastoma and Non-WNT/Non-SHH". This search resulted in nine distinct clinical trials, five for newly diagnosed medulloblastoma and four for recurrent medulloblastoma. Four trials for newly diagnosed medulloblastoma had a component of craniospinal irradiation reduction for patients with WNT medulloblastoma. Molecularly stratified trials for recurrent medulloblastoma largely focus on SHH. As these trials are ongoing, there are limited data available. A trial in which newly-diagnosed WNT patients received modest chemotherapy without radiation has been closed to accrual due to several early failures. Phase II trials evaluating vismodegib for SHH medulloblastoma in children and adults have been disappointing. In conclusion, although there is an expanding array of clinical trials which incorporate molecular data in prescribing treatment for newly-diagnosed and recurrent medulloblastoma, treatments for these diseases are fairly uniform, with craniospinal radiation dose being the main variable. As the drivers of the distinct subgroups and their associated prognoses are better elucidated, future clinical trials and novel targeted agents are needed to improve outcomes and reduce toxicity where feasible.
Authors
MLA Citation
Thompson, Eric M., et al. “Current medulloblastoma subgroup specific clinical trials.Transl Pediatr, vol. 9, no. 2, Apr. 2020, pp. 157–62. Pubmed, doi:10.21037/tp.2020.03.03.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1440624
PMID
32477916
Source
pubmed
Published In
Transl Pediatr
Volume
9
Published Date
Start Page
157
End Page
162
DOI
10.21037/tp.2020.03.03

ABC Transporter Inhibition Plus Dexamethasone Enhances the Efficacy of Convection Enhanced Delivery in H3.3K27M Mutant Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

BACKGROUND: An impermeable blood-brain barrier and drug efflux via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters such as p-glycoprotein may contribute to underwhelming efficacy of peripherally delivered agents to treat diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). OBJECTIVE: To explore the pharmacological augmentation of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) infusate for DIPG. METHODS: The efficacy of CED dasatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in a transgenic H3.3K27M mutant murine model was assessed. mRNA expression of ABCB1 (p-glycoprotein) was analyzed in 14 tumor types in 274 children. In Vitro viability studies of dasatinib, the p-glycoprotein inhibitor, tariquidar, and dexamethasone were performed in 2 H3.3K27M mutant cell lines. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate CED infusate (gadolinium/dasatinib) distribution in animals pretreated with tariquidar and dexamethasone. Histological assessment of apoptosis was performed. RESULTS: Continuous delivery CED dasatinib improved median overall survival (OS) of animals harboring DIPG in comparison to vehicle (39.5 and 28.5 d, respectively; P = .0139). Mean ABCB1 expression was highest in K27M gliomas. In Vitro, the addition of tariquidar and dexamethasone further enhanced the efficacy of dasatinib (P < .001). In Vivo, MRI demonstrated no difference in infusion dispersion between animals pretreated with dexamethasone plus tariquidar prior to CED dasatinib compared to the CED dasatinib. However, tumor apoptosis was the highest in the pretreatment group (P < .001). Correspondingly, median OS was longer in the pretreatment group (49 d) than the dasatinib alone group (39 d) and no treatment controls (31.5 d, P = .0305). CONCLUSION: ABC transporter inhibition plus dexamethasone enhances the efficacy of CED dasatinib, resulting in enhanced tumor cellular apoptosis and improved survival in H3.3K27M mutant DIPG.
Authors
Tsvankin, V; Hashizume, R; Katagi, H; Herndon, JE; Lascola, C; Venkatraman, TN; Picard, D; Burrus, B; Becher, OJ; Thompson, EM
MLA Citation
Tsvankin, Vadim, et al. “ABC Transporter Inhibition Plus Dexamethasone Enhances the Efficacy of Convection Enhanced Delivery in H3.3K27M Mutant Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.Neurosurgery, vol. 86, no. 5, May 2020, pp. 742–51. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/neuros/nyz212.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1393246
PMID
31225627
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neurosurgery
Volume
86
Published Date
Start Page
742
End Page
751
DOI
10.1093/neuros/nyz212

Pediatrics.

Authors
Chern, JJ; Bollo, RJ; Governale, LS; Halvorson, KG; Hooten, K; Kulkarni, AV; Lo, W; Mathieu, F; Mrowczynski, O; Piatt, J; Rizk, E; Thompson, E
MLA Citation
Chern, Joshua J., et al. “Pediatrics.Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown), vol. 17, no. Suppl 2, Aug. 2019, pp. S182–208. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/ons/opz078.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1385943
PMID
31099844
Source
pubmed
Published In
Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown)
Volume
17
Published Date
Start Page
S182
End Page
S208
DOI
10.1093/ons/opz078

Using a 2-variable method in radionuclide shuntography to predict shunt patency.

OBJECT: Radionuclide shuntography interpretation is uncertain when the tracer fails to enter the ventricles but quickly drains distally or when the tracer enters the ventricles but takes longer than 15 minutes to drain distally. The purpose of this study was to aid in the clinical interpretation of a variety of shuntography results and to determine the applicability of shuntography in different patient populations. METHODS: The results of 259 shuntograms were reviewed. Chi-square analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between clinical variables and shuntography results. Two-by-two binary classification analyses were performed to determine the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for 4 different combinatorial types of shuntography results based on 2 variables: ventricular tracer entry and distal tracer drainage. RESULTS: Median patient age was 19 years, and 51% of patients were male. The most common presentation in patients undergoing shuntography was headache (169/254, 66.5%) with radiographically stable ventricle size. Of 227 patients with available imaging data, 163 (71.8%) presented with the same ventricle size as shown on a previous asymptomatic scan, 43 (18.9%) had larger ventricles, and 21 (9.2%) had smaller ventricles. Within 30 days of shuntography, 74 of 259 patients (28.6%) underwent surgical shunt exploration: 65 were found to have an obstructed shunt and 9 were found to have a patent shunt. Of those patients not undergoing surgery, the median length of benign clinical follow-up was 1051 days. Clinical variables were not significantly associated with shuntography results, including valve type (p = 0.180), ventricle size (p = 0.556), age (p = 0.549), distal drainage site (p = 0.098), and hydrocephalus etiology (p = 0.937). Shuntography results of patients with myelomeningocele were not dissociable from those of the group as a whole. Sensitivity to diagnose shunt failure was lowest (37.5%) but specificity was highest (97.2%) when the definition of a "normal" shuntogram included any tracer movement into the distal site within 45 minutes. Conversely, sensitivity was highest (87.5%) and specificity was lowest (51.4%) when the definition was limited exclusively to tracer entry into the ventricles and distal drainage within 15 minutes. CONCLUSIONS: Even with a stringent definition of a "normal" shuntogram, sensitivity and specificity were relatively low for a diagnostic test. Clinical variables such as valve type, ventricle size, patient age, distal drainage site, and etiology of hydrocephalus were not associated with shuntography results.
Authors
Thompson, EM; Wagner, K; Kronfeld, K; Selden, NR
MLA Citation
Thompson, Eric M., et al. “Using a 2-variable method in radionuclide shuntography to predict shunt patency.J Neurosurg, vol. 121, no. 6, Dec. 2014, pp. 1504–07. Pubmed, doi:10.3171/2014.8.JNS132898.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1114195
PMID
25259566
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Neurosurg
Volume
121
Published Date
Start Page
1504
End Page
1507
DOI
10.3171/2014.8.JNS132898

Research Areas:

Brain Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Proteins
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Neoplasms, Experimental
Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue
Spine--Abnormalities--Surgery