Julia Visgauss

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

Orthopaedic Surgery
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2012

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Resident, Orthopaedic Surgery

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

Genetic Profiling of Chondrosarcoma: A Clinical and Histologic Correlative Study

Awarded By
Piedmont Orthopedic Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Investigating the role of LCP1 in metastatic progression of chondrosarcoma

Administered By
Orthopaedic Surgery
Awarded By
The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Juxtametallic Bipolar Bone Radiofrequency Ablation: Thermal Monitoring in an Ex-Vivo Model with Specimen MRI and Histopathologic Correlation.

PURPOSE: To measure the ablation zone temperature and nontarget tissue temperature during radiofrequency (RF) ablation in bone containing metal instrumentation versus no metal instrumentation (control group). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ex vivo experiments were performed on 15 swine vertebrae (control, n = 5; titanium screw, n = 5; stainless steel screw, n = 5). Screws and RF ablation probe were inserted identically under fluoroscopy. During RF ablation (3 W, 5 minutes), temperature was measured 10 mm from RF ablation centerpoint and in muscle contacting the screw. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, gross pathologic, and histopathologic analyses were performed on 1 specimen from each group. RESULTS: Ablation zone temperatures at 2.5 and 5 minutes increased by 12.2 °C ± 2.6 °C and 21.5 °C ± 2.1 °C (control); 11.0 °C ± 4.1 °C and 20.0 °C ± 2.9 °C (juxta-titanium screw), and 10.0 °C ± 3.4 °C and 17.2 °C ± 3.5 °C (juxta-stainless steel) screw; differences among groups did not reach significance by analysis of variance (P = .87). Mixed-effects linear regression revealed a statistically significant increase in temperature over time in all 3 groups (4.2 °C/min ± 0.4 °C/min, P < .001). Compared with the control, there was no significant difference in the temperature change over time for titanium (-0.3 °C/min ± 0.5 °C/min, P = .53) or steel groups (-0.4 °C/min ± 0.5 °C/min, P = .38). The mean screw temperature at the final time point did not show a statistically significant change compared with baseline in either the titanium group (-1.2 °C ± 2.3 °C, P = .50) or steel group (2.6 °C ± 2.9 °C, P = .11). MR imaging and pathologic analyses revealed homogeneous ablation without sparing of the peri-hardware zones. CONCLUSIONS: Adjacent metallic instrumentation did not affect the rate of or absolute increase in temperature in the ablation zone, did not create peri-metallic ablation inhomogeneities, and did not result in significant nontarget heating of muscle tissue in contact with the metal instrumentation.
Authors
Sag, AA; Sperduto, WAL; Eward, W; Ronald, J; Davis, H; Jiang, XS; Enterline, DS; Visgauss, J; Brigman, B; Goodwin, CR; Qadri, YJ; Kim, CY
MLA Citation
Sag, Alan A., et al. “Juxtametallic Bipolar Bone Radiofrequency Ablation: Thermal Monitoring in an Ex-Vivo Model with Specimen MRI and Histopathologic Correlation.J Vasc Interv Radiol, vol. 33, no. 12, Dec. 2022, pp. 1594–600. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jvir.2022.08.019.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1533606
PMID
36007783
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Vasc Interv Radiol
Volume
33
Published Date
Start Page
1594
End Page
1600
DOI
10.1016/j.jvir.2022.08.019

Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Megaprosthetic Reconstructions: Drug and Dosing May Matter More than Duration.

In orthopedic oncology, the implant of a megaprosthetic device is standard of care after large-scale tumor resection involving segmental removal of bone. Infection remains the leading cause of implant failure, often resulting in major morbidity. Perioperative antibiotic practices for megaprosthetic reconstructions are not standardized and are based on guidelines for conventional joint arthroplasties. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of current prophylactic strategies for megaprosthetic reconstructions. We conducted a retrospective review of megaprosthetic reconstructions performed at Duke University from 2001 to 2021. Logistic regression with GEE was used to assess whether a prolonged course of postoperative antibiotics is associated with infection risk. We assessed the microbial profile and corresponding susceptibilities of megaprosthetic infections through record review. Additionally, we designed a pharmacokinetic subgroup analysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to quantify antibiotic concentrations in surgical tissue. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to correlate tissue concentrations with infection risk. Out of 184 cases, 23 (12.5%) developed infection within 1 year. Extended postoperative antibiotics were not significantly associated with infection risk (P = 0.23). Among 18 culture-positive cases, 4 (22.2%) were caused by cefazolin-susceptible organisms. Median bone and muscle concentrations of cefazolin among cases that developed postoperative infection (0.065 ng/mL and 0.2 ng/mL, respectively) were significantly lower than those of cases that did not (0.42 ng/mL and 1.95 ng/mL, P < 0.01 and P = 0.03). This study is the first to comprehensively assess aspects of perioperative prophylaxis for megaprosthetic reconstructions. Extending postoperative antibiotics did not reduce infection risk. We detected a high frequency of cefazolin nonsusceptible organisms among postoperative infections. Additionally, intraoperative antibiotic tissue concentrations may be predictive of later infection. Future studies ought to examine optimal drug choices and dosing strategies.
Authors
Byers, IS; Turner, NA; Levine, NL; Lazarides, AL; Evans, DR; Spasojevic, I; Fan, P; Jung, S-H; Gao, J; Visgauss, JD; Brigman, BE; Eward, WC
MLA Citation
Byers, Isabelle S., et al. “Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Megaprosthetic Reconstructions: Drug and Dosing May Matter More than Duration.Antimicrob Agents Chemother, vol. 66, no. 10, Oct. 2022, p. e0014022. Pubmed, doi:10.1128/aac.00140-22.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1553045
PMID
36165615
Source
pubmed
Published In
Antimicrob Agents Chemother
Volume
66
Published Date
Start Page
e0014022
DOI
10.1128/aac.00140-22

Sternoclavicular injuries

Authors
MLA Citation
Visgauss, J. D. “Sternoclavicular injuries.” Sports Medicine For The Orthopedic Resident, 2016, pp. 75–82.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1510162
Source
scopus
Published Date
Start Page
75
End Page
82

Effect of COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns on planned cancer surgery for 15 tumour types in 61 countries: an international, prospective, cohort study.

BACKGROUND: Surgery is the main modality of cure for solid cancers and was prioritised to continue during COVID-19 outbreaks. This study aimed to identify immediate areas for system strengthening by comparing the delivery of elective cancer surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic in periods of lockdown versus light restriction. METHODS: This international, prospective, cohort study enrolled 20 006 adult (≥18 years) patients from 466 hospitals in 61 countries with 15 cancer types, who had a decision for curative surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic and were followed up until the point of surgery or cessation of follow-up (Aug 31, 2020). Average national Oxford COVID-19 Stringency Index scores were calculated to define the government response to COVID-19 for each patient for the period they awaited surgery, and classified into light restrictions (index <20), moderate lockdowns (20-60), and full lockdowns (>60). The primary outcome was the non-operation rate (defined as the proportion of patients who did not undergo planned surgery). Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to explore the associations between lockdowns and non-operation. Intervals from diagnosis to surgery were compared across COVID-19 government response index groups. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04384926. FINDINGS: Of eligible patients awaiting surgery, 2003 (10·0%) of 20 006 did not receive surgery after a median follow-up of 23 weeks (IQR 16-30), all of whom had a COVID-19-related reason given for non-operation. Light restrictions were associated with a 0·6% non-operation rate (26 of 4521), moderate lockdowns with a 5·5% rate (201 of 3646; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0·81, 95% CI 0·77-0·84; p<0·0001), and full lockdowns with a 15·0% rate (1775 of 11 827; HR 0·51, 0·50-0·53; p<0·0001). In sensitivity analyses, including adjustment for SARS-CoV-2 case notification rates, moderate lockdowns (HR 0·84, 95% CI 0·80-0·88; p<0·001), and full lockdowns (0·57, 0·54-0·60; p<0·001), remained independently associated with non-operation. Surgery beyond 12 weeks from diagnosis in patients without neoadjuvant therapy increased during lockdowns (374 [9·1%] of 4521 in light restrictions, 317 [10·4%] of 3646 in moderate lockdowns, 2001 [23·8%] of 11 827 in full lockdowns), although there were no differences in resectability rates observed with longer delays. INTERPRETATION: Cancer surgery systems worldwide were fragile to lockdowns, with one in seven patients who were in regions with full lockdowns not undergoing planned surgery and experiencing longer preoperative delays. Although short-term oncological outcomes were not compromised in those selected for surgery, delays and non-operations might lead to long-term reductions in survival. During current and future periods of societal restriction, the resilience of elective surgery systems requires strengthening, which might include protected elective surgical pathways and long-term investment in surge capacity for acute care during public health emergencies to protect elective staff and services. FUNDING: National Institute for Health Research Global Health Research Unit, Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland, Bowel and Cancer Research, Bowel Disease Research Foundation, Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons, British Association of Surgical Oncology, British Gynaecological Cancer Society, European Society of Coloproctology, Medtronic, Sarcoma UK, The Urology Foundation, Vascular Society for Great Britain and Ireland, and Yorkshire Cancer Research.
Authors
COVIDSurg Collaborative,
MLA Citation
COVIDSurg Collaborative, P. “Effect of COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns on planned cancer surgery for 15 tumour types in 61 countries: an international, prospective, cohort study.Lancet Oncol, vol. 22, no. 11, Nov. 2021, pp. 1507–17. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/S1470-2045(21)00493-9.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1503792
PMID
34624250
Source
pubmed
Published In
Lancet Oncol
Volume
22
Published Date
Start Page
1507
End Page
1517
DOI
10.1016/S1470-2045(21)00493-9

Intraoperative angiography imaging correlates with wound complications following soft tissue sarcoma resection.

For soft tissue sarcoma patients receiving preoperative radiation therapy, wound complications are common and potentially devastating. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescent angiography (ICGA) as a predictor of wound complications in these patients. A consecutive series of patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the extremities or pelvis who received neoadjuvant radiation and a subsequent radical resection received intraoperative ICGA with the SPY PHI device (Stryker Inc.) at the time of closure. Retrospective analysis of fluorescence signal along multiple points of the wound length was performed and quantified. The primary endpoint was wound complication, defined as delayed wound healing or wound dehiscence, within 3 months of surgery. Fourteen patients with preoperative irradiated soft tissue sarcoma were consecutively imaged. There were six patients with wound complications classified as "aseptic" in five cases. Using the ICGA, blinded surgeons correctly predicted wound complications in 75% of cases. During the inflow phase, a mean ratio of normal of 0.62 maximized the area under the curve (AUC = 0.90) for predicting wound complications with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 77.4%. During the peak phase, a mean ratio of normal of 0.55 maximized the AUC (0.95) for predicting wound complications with a sensitivity of 88.9% and a specificity of 100%. Intraoperative use of ICGA may help to predict wound complications in patients undergoing resection of preoperatively irradiated soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities and pelvis.
Authors
Lazarides, AL; Saltzman, EB; Visgauss, JD; Mithani, SK; Eward, WC; Brigman, BE
MLA Citation
Lazarides, Alexander L., et al. “Intraoperative angiography imaging correlates with wound complications following soft tissue sarcoma resection.J Orthop Res, vol. 40, no. 10, Oct. 2022, pp. 2382–90. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/jor.25270.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1505865
PMID
35005805
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Orthop Res
Volume
40
Published Date
Start Page
2382
End Page
2390
DOI
10.1002/jor.25270