Kyle Walsh

Overview:

Dr. Walsh is Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and Pathology, Director of the Division of Neuro-epidemiology, and a Senior Fellow in the Duke Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development. He leads Duke’s Neuro-epidemiology Lab, which integrates bench science with statistical methods to study the neurobiology of glial senescence and gliomagenesis. This research interrogates human genomic and epigenomic profiles to identify both heritable and modifiable factors that contribute to neurologic and physical decline, applying these approaches to studying the shared neurobiology of cognition, glial senescence, and gliomagenesis. The lab has a long history studying telomere maintenance in pre-malignant cells and its role in the development of cancer, most notably glioblastoma.

Positions:

Associate Professor in Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Pediatrics

Pediatrics, Children's Health Discovery Institute
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2011

Yale University School of Medicine

Grants:

My Childhood Cancer: Survey Series

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Alex's Lemonade Stand
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Genetic Susceptibility to Pediatric Glioma in Individuals and Diverse populations

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
University of Southern California
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The role of rare and common variants in genetic predisposition to medulloblastoma

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Sontag Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Genetic Susceptibility to pediatric Osteosarcoma and Interaction with Measures of Childhood Growth

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Alex's Lemonade Stand
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Immune Correlates and Mechanisms of Perinatal Cytomegalovirus Infection and Later Life ALL Development

Administered By
Pediatrics, Children's Health Discovery Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Financial hardships and psychosocial outcomes among parents of children who die of cancer.

BACKGROUND: Caregivers experience financial hardship during a child's cancer treatment and after their child's death. These bereaved caregivers also experience negative psychosocial outcomes following the death of a child, but the relationship between financial hardship and negative psychosocial outcomes is poorly understood in this population. METHODS: We surveyed self-selected bereaved caregivers as part of a publicly posted survey through Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation in order to explore family experiences after losing a child to cancer. The survey contained questions regarding parent psychosocial and financial outcomes following their child's death. RESULTS: One-hundred seventy-six caregivers completed the survey a median of 7 years after their child's death. The majority were female (91%), non-Hispanic White (97%), and married or living with a domestic partner (76%). Overall, 31% of caregivers reported that their child's death significantly impacted the financial well-being of their family, 23% experienced a decrease in income following their child's death, and 14% were still paying medical expenses. Financial hardship that the caregiver attributed to the child's death was associated with feeling lonely and isolated (adjusted relative risk [ARR] = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1-2.7) and living day to day (ARR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.3-2.5), even after adjustment for household income and time since child's death. CONCLUSIONS: Caregivers experience multiple financial hardships following the death of a child to cancer, which endure for years after the child's death. These hardships are associated with negative psychosocial outcomes, demonstrating the need for both financial and psychosocial interventions for caregivers following the death of a child to cancer.
Authors
Davis, ES; Wimberly, CE; Towry, L; Johnston, EE; Walsh, KM
MLA Citation
Davis, Elizabeth S., et al. “Financial hardships and psychosocial outcomes among parents of children who die of cancer.Pediatr Blood Cancer, vol. 70, no. 2, Feb. 2023, p. e30066. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/pbc.30066.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1558815
PMID
36510751
Source
pubmed
Published In
Pediatr Blood Cancer
Volume
70
Published Date
Start Page
e30066
DOI
10.1002/pbc.30066

Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Levels

Authors
Vyas, N; Wimberly, C; Beaman, M; Kaplan, S; Rasmussen, LJH; Wertz, J; Gifford, E; Walsh, K
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1533299
Source
epmc
Published Date
DOI
10.1101/2022.08.16.22278345

Localized variation in ancestral admixture identifies pilocytic astrocytoma risk loci among Latino children.

BACKGROUND: Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common pediatric brain tumor. PA has at least a 50% higher incidence in populations of European ancestry compared to other ancestral groups, which may be due in part to genetic differences. METHODS: We first compared the global proportions of European, African, and Amerindian ancestries in 301 PA cases and 1185 controls of self-identified Latino ethnicity from the California Biobank. We then conducted admixture mapping analysis to assess PA risk with local ancestry. RESULTS: We found PA cases had a significantly higher proportion of global European ancestry than controls (case median = 0.55, control median = 0.51, P value = 3.5x10-3). Admixture mapping identified 13 SNPs in the 6q14.3 region (SNX14) contributing to risk, as well as three other peaks approaching significance on chromosomes 7, 10 and 13. Downstream fine mapping in these regions revealed several SNPs potentially contributing to childhood PA risk. CONCLUSIONS: There is a significant difference in genomic ancestry associated with Latino PA risk and several genomic loci potentially mediating this risk.
Authors
Li, S; Chiang, CWK; Myint, SS; Arroyo, K; Chan, TF; Morimoto, L; Metayer, C; de Smith, AJ; Walsh, KM; Wiemels, JL
MLA Citation
Li, Shaobo, et al. “Localized variation in ancestral admixture identifies pilocytic astrocytoma risk loci among Latino children.Plos Genet, vol. 18, no. 9, Sept. 2022, p. e1010388. Pubmed, doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1010388.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1534944
PMID
36070312
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plos Genet
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
e1010388
DOI
10.1371/journal.pgen.1010388

Cross-ancestry genome-wide meta-analysis of 61,047 cases and 947,237 controls identifies new susceptibility loci contributing to lung cancer.

To identify new susceptibility loci to lung cancer among diverse populations, we performed cross-ancestry genome-wide association studies in European, East Asian and African populations and discovered five loci that have not been previously reported. We replicated 26 signals and identified 10 new lead associations from previously reported loci. Rare-variant associations tended to be specific to populations, but even common-variant associations influencing smoking behavior, such as those with CHRNA5 and CYP2A6, showed population specificity. Fine-mapping and expression quantitative trait locus colocalization nominated several candidate variants and susceptibility genes such as IRF4 and FUBP1. DNA damage assays of prioritized genes in lung fibroblasts indicated that a subset of these genes, including the pleiotropic gene IRF4, potentially exert effects by promoting endogenous DNA damage.
Authors
Byun, J; Han, Y; Li, Y; Xia, J; Long, E; Choi, J; Xiao, X; Zhu, M; Zhou, W; Sun, R; Bossé, Y; Song, Z; Schwartz, A; Lusk, C; Rafnar, T; Stefansson, K; Zhang, T; Zhao, W; Pettit, RW; Liu, Y; Li, X; Zhou, H; Walsh, KM; Gorlov, I; Gorlova, O; Zhu, D; Rosenberg, SM; Pinney, S; Bailey-Wilson, JE; Mandal, D; de Andrade, M; Gaba, C; Willey, JC; You, M; Anderson, M; Wiencke, JK; Albanes, D; Lam, S; Tardon, A; Chen, C; Goodman, G; Bojeson, S; Brenner, H; Landi, MT; Chanock, SJ; Johansson, M; Muley, T; Risch, A; Wichmann, H-E; Bickeböller, H; Christiani, DC; Rennert, G; Arnold, S; Field, JK; Shete, S; Le Marchand, L; Melander, O; Brunnstrom, H; Liu, G; Andrew, AS; Kiemeney, LA; Shen, H; Zienolddiny, S; Grankvist, K; Johansson, M; Caporaso, N; Cox, A; Hong, Y-C; Yuan, J-M; Lazarus, P; Schabath, MB; Aldrich, MC; Patel, A; Lan, Q; Rothman, N; Taylor, F; Kachuri, L; Witte, JS; Sakoda, LC; Spitz, M; Brennan, P; Lin, X; McKay, J; Hung, RJ; Amos, CI
MLA Citation
Byun, Jinyoung, et al. “Cross-ancestry genome-wide meta-analysis of 61,047 cases and 947,237 controls identifies new susceptibility loci contributing to lung cancer.Nat Genet, vol. 54, no. 8, Aug. 2022, pp. 1167–77. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41588-022-01115-x.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1531644
PMID
35915169
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nat Genet
Volume
54
Published Date
Start Page
1167
End Page
1177
DOI
10.1038/s41588-022-01115-x

Influence of county-level geographic/ancestral origin on glioma incidence and outcomes in US Hispanics.

PURPOSE: Glioma incidence is 25% lower in Hispanics than White non-Hispanics. The U.S. Hispanic population is diverse, and registry-based analyses may mask incidence differences associated with geographic/ancestral origins. METHODS: County-level glioma incidence data in Hispanics were retrieved from the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS). American Community Survey data were used to determine county-level proportion of the Hispanic population of Mexican/Central-American origin and of Caribbean origin. Age-adjusted incidence rate-ratios and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) quantified the glioma incidence differences across groups. State-level estimates of admixture in Hispanics were obtained from published 23andMe data. RESULTS: Compared to predominantly Caribbean-origin counties, predominantly Mexican/Central-American-origin counties had lower age-adjusted risks of glioma (IRR=0.83; P<0.0001), glioblastoma (IRR=0.86; P<0.0001), diffuse/anaplastic astrocytoma (IRR=0.78; P<0.0001), oligodendroglioma (IRR=0.82; P<0.0001), ependymoma (IRR=0.88; P=0.012), and pilocytic astrocytoma (IRR=0.76; P<0.0001). Associations were consistent in children and adults, and using more granular geographic regions. Despite having lower glioma incidence, Hispanic glioblastoma patients from predominantly Mexican/Central-American-origin counties had poorer survival than Hispanics living in predominantly Caribbean-origin counties. Incidence and survival differences could be partially explained by state-level estimates of European admixture in Hispanics, with European admixture associated with higher incidence and improved survival. CONCLUSIONS: Glioma incidence and outcomes differ in association with the geographic origins of Hispanic communities, with counties of predominantly Mexican/Central-American-origin at significantly reduced risk and those of Caribbean-origin at comparatively greater risk. Although typically classified as a single ethnic group, appreciating the cultural, socioeconomic, and genetic diversity of Hispanics can advance cancer disparities research.
Authors
Walsh, KM; Neff, C; Bondy, ML; Kruchko, C; Huse, JT; Amos, CI; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Ostrom, QT
MLA Citation
Walsh, Kyle M., et al. “Influence of county-level geographic/ancestral origin on glioma incidence and outcomes in US Hispanics.Neuro Oncol, July 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/neuonc/noac175.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1529283
PMID
35868246
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncol
Published Date
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/noac175

Research Areas:

Muser Mentor