Qingyi Wei

Overview:

Qingyi Wei, MD, PhD, Professor in the Department of Medicine, is Associate Director for Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Co-leader of CCPS and Co-leader of Epidemiology and Population Genomics (Focus Area 1). He is a professor of Medicine and an internationally recognized epidemiologist focused on the molecular and genetic epidemiology of head and neck cancers, lung cancer, and melanoma. His research focuses on biomarkers and genetic determinants for the DNA repair deficient phenotype and variations in cell death. He is Editor-in-Chief of the open access journal "Cancer Medicine" and Associate Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Molecular Epidemiology and Genetics.

Area of Expertise: Epidemiology

Positions:

Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Professor in Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.M. 1983

Nanjing Medical University (China)

Ph.D. 1993

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Grants:

Postdoctoral Training in Genomic Medicine Research

Administered By
Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

Helicobacter pylori blood biomarker for gastric cancer risk in East Asia

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The UGT2A and 3A metabolizing enzymes and tobacco-related cancer risk

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Washington State University
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Genotypes and Phenotypes of Apoptosis and Risk of Head and Neck Cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Molecular Epidemiology of DNA Repair in Head and Neck Cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Abstract 1570: Genome-wide association study identifies variants at 3p26.1 linked to survival in ovarian cancer patients among Chinese women

Authors
Dai, H; Chu, X; Wang, W; Yang, H; Wang, Q; Li, MJ; Wei, Q; Chen, K
MLA Citation
Dai, Hongji, et al. “Abstract 1570: Genome-wide association study identifies variants at 3p26.1 linked to survival in ovarian cancer patients among Chinese women.” Epidemiology, American Association for Cancer Research, 2019. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7445.am2019-1570.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1416535
Source
crossref
Published In
Epidemiology
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.am2019-1570

Common genetic variation and risk of osteosarcoma in a multi-ethnic pediatric and adolescent population.

Osteosarcoma, a malignant primary bone tumor most commonly diagnosed in children and adolescents, has a poorly understood genetic etiology. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate-gene analyses have identified putative risk variants in subjects of European ancestry. However, despite higher incidence among African-American and Hispanic children, little is known regarding common heritable variation that contributes to osteosarcoma incidence and clinical presentation across racial/ethnic groups. In a multi-ethnic sample of non-Hispanic white, Hispanic, African-American and Asian/Pacific Islander children (537 cases, 2165 controls), we performed association analyses assessing previously-reported loci for osteosarcoma risk and metastasis, including meta-analysis across racial/ethnic groups. We also assessed a previously described association between genetic predisposition to longer leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and osteosarcoma risk in this independent multi-ethnic dataset. In our sample, we were unable to replicate previously-reported loci for osteosarcoma risk or metastasis detected in GWAS of European-ancestry individuals in either ethnicity-stratified analyses or meta-analysis across ethnic groups. Our analyses did confirm that genetic predisposition to longer LTL is a risk factor for osteosarcoma (ORmeta: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.09-1.36; P = 3.8 × 10-4), and the strongest effect was seen in Hispanic subjects (OR: 1.32; 95% CI: 1.12-1.54, P = 6.2 × 10-4). Our findings shed light on the replicability of osteosarcoma risk loci across ethnicities and motivate further characterization of these genetic factors in diverse clinical cohorts.
Authors
Zhang, C; Hansen, HM; Semmes, EC; Gonzalez-Maya, J; Morimoto, L; Wei, Q; Eward, WC; DeWitt, SB; Hurst, JH; Metayer, C; de Smith, AJ; Wiemels, JL; Walsh, KM
MLA Citation
Zhang, Chenan, et al. “Common genetic variation and risk of osteosarcoma in a multi-ethnic pediatric and adolescent population..” Bone, vol. 130, Jan. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.bone.2019.115070.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1411824
PMID
31525475
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bone
Volume
130
Published Date
Start Page
115070
DOI
10.1016/j.bone.2019.115070

A genetic variant within MDM4 3'UTR miRNA binding site is associated with HPV16-positive tumors and survival of oropharyngeal cancer.

As mouse double minute 4 (MDM4) and HPV16 E6 oncoproteins play important roles in inhibition of p53 activity, a functional polymorphism (rs4245739) in the 3' untranslated regions of MDM4 targeted by microRNA-191 may alter its expression level or functional efficiency, thus affecting tumor status and survival in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive squamous cell carcinoma of oropharynx (SCCOP). A total of 564 incident SCCOP patients with definitive radiotherapy were included for determination of tumor HPV16 status and genotypes of the polymorphism. Univariate and multivariable Cox models were performed to assess the associations between the polymorphism and outcomes. We found that MDM4 rs4245739 had statistically significant associations with tumor HPV-positivity and survival of SCCOP patients. Patients with AC/CC variant genotypes of MDM4 rs4245739 were approximately 3-fold more likely to be HPV16-positive tumors among SCCOP patients compared with common homozygous AA genotype (adjusted odds ratio = 3.2, 95% confidence interval = 1.9-5.5). Moreover, patients with MDM4 rs4245739 AC/CC variant genotypes had significantly better overall, disease-specific, and disease-free survival compared with those with the corresponding common homozygous AA genotype (all log-rank = P < .05); and these genotypes were significantly associated with an approximately three to four times reduced risk of overall death, death owing to disease, and recurrence after multivariable adjustment. Finally, the significant effects of MDM4 rs4245739 polymorphism on survival were found among HPV16-positive SCCOP patients only after the stratified analyses by tumor HPV status. We concluded that MDM4 rs4245739 polymorphism is significantly associated with tumor HPV status and survival of SCCOP, especially in HPV16-positive SCCOP patients treated with definitive radiotherapy; nevertheless, prospective larger studies are warranted.
Authors
Zhang, Y; Sturgis, EM; Wei, P; Liu, H; Wang, Z; Ma, Y; Liu, C; Gu, KJ; Wei, Q; Li, G
MLA Citation
Zhang, Yang, et al. “A genetic variant within MDM4 3'UTR miRNA binding site is associated with HPV16-positive tumors and survival of oropharyngeal cancer..” Mol Carcinog, vol. 58, no. 12, Dec. 2019, pp. 2276–85. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/mc.23116.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1409947
PMID
31513313
Source
pubmed
Published In
Molecular Carcinogenesis
Volume
58
Published Date
Start Page
2276
End Page
2285
DOI
10.1002/mc.23116

Novel genetic variants in KIF16B and NEDD4L in the endosome-related genes are associated with nonsmall cell lung cancer survival.

The endosome is a membrane-bound organ inside most eukaryotic cells, playing an important role in adaptive immunity by delivering endocytosed antigens to both MHC class I and II pathways. Here, by analyzing genotyping data from two published genome-wide association studies (GWASs), we evaluated associations between genetic variants in the endosome-related gene-set and survival of patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The discovery included 44,112 (3,478 genotyped and 40,634 imputed) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 220 genes in a singlelocus analysis for their associations with survival of 1,185 NSCLC patients from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. After validation of the 821 survival-associated significant SNPs in additional 984 NSCLC patients from the Harvard Lung Cancer Susceptibility Study, 14 SNPs remained significant. The final multivariate stepwise Cox proportional hazards regression modeling of the PLCO dataset identified three potentially functional and independent SNPs (i.e., KIF16B rs1555195 C>T, NEDD4L rs11660748 A>G and rs73440898 A>G) with an adjusted hazards ratio (HR) of 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.79-0.94, p = 0.0007), 1.31 (1.16-1.47, p = 6.0 × 10-5 ) and 1.27 (1.12-1.44, p = 0.0001) for overall survival (OS), respectively. Combined analysis of the adverse genotypes of these three SNPs revealed a trend in the genotype-survival association (ptrend < 0.0001 for OS and ptrend < 0.0001 for disease-specific survival). Furthermore, the survival-associated KIF16B rs1555195T allele was significantly associated with decreased mRNA expression levels of KIF16B in both lung tissues and blood cells. Therefore, genetic variants of the endosome-related genes may be biomarker for NSCLC survival, possibly through modulating the expression of corresponding genes.
Authors
Yang, S; Tang, D; Zhao, YC; Liu, H; Luo, S; Stinchcombe, TE; Glass, C; Su, L; Shen, S; Christiani, DC; Wang, Q; Wei, Q
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1416421
PMID
31618441
Source
pubmed
Published In
Int J Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/ijc.32739

P1.01-33 Genetic Variants in FIG4 and IGF1R in the Endosome-Related Genes Are Associated with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Survival

Authors
Yang, S; Wei, Q; Christiani, D; Wang, Q
MLA Citation
Yang, S., et al. “P1.01-33 Genetic Variants in FIG4 and IGF1R in the Endosome-Related Genes Are Associated with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Survival.” Journal of Thoracic Oncology, vol. 14, no. 10, Elsevier BV, 2019, pp. S369–S369. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.jtho.2019.08.748.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1417874
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Volume
14
Published Date
Start Page
S369
End Page
S369
DOI
10.1016/j.jtho.2019.08.748