Christina Williams

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2009

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Grants:

Publications:

Aging

MLA Citation
Zullig, L. L., et al. “Aging.” Handbook of Cancer Survivorship: Second Edition, 2018, pp. 91–109. Scopus, doi:10.1007/978-3-319-77432-9_6.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1421455
Source
scopus
Published Date
Start Page
91
End Page
109
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-77432-9_6

Cardiovascular disease-related chronic conditions among Veterans Affairs nonmetastatic colorectal cancer survivors: a matched case-control analysis.

Purpose: The growing number of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors often have multiple chronic conditions. Comparing nonmetastatic CRC survivors and matched noncancer controls, our objectives were to determine the odds of CRC survivors being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related chronic conditions and their likelihood of control during the year after CRC diagnosis. Patients and methods: We retrospectively identified patients diagnosed with nonmetastatic CRC in the Veterans Affairs health care system from fiscal years 2009 to 2012 and matched each with up to 3 noncancer control patients. We used logistic regression to assess differences in the likelihood of being diagnosed with CVD-related chronic conditions and control between nonmetastatic CRC survivors and noncancer controls. Results: We identified 9,758 nonmetastatic CRC patients and matched them to 29,066 noncancer controls. At baseline, 69.4% of CRC survivors and their matched controls were diagnosed with hypertension, 52.4% with hyperlipidemia, and 36.7% with diabetes. Compared to matched noncancer controls, CRC survivors had 57% higher odds of being diagnosed with hypertension (OR=1.57, 95% CI=1.49-1.64) and 7% higher odds of controlled blood pressure (OR=1.07, 95% CI 1.02, 1.13) in the subsequent year. Compared to matched noncancer control patients, CRC survivors had half the odds of being diagnosed with hyperlipidemia (OR=0.50, 95% CI=0.48-0.52) and lower odds of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) control (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.81-0.94). There were no significant differences between groups for diabetes diagnoses or control. Conclusion: Compared to noncancer controls, nonmetastatic CRC survivors have 1) greater likelihood of being diagnosed with hypertension and worse blood pressure control in the year following diagnosis; 2) lower likelihood of being diagnosed with hyperlipidemia or LDL control; and 3) comparable diabetes diagnoses and control. There may be a need for hypertension control interventions targeting cancer survivors.
Authors
Zullig, LL; Smith, VA; Lindquist, JH; Williams, CD; Weinberger, M; Provenzale, D; Jackson, GL; Kelley, MJ; Danus, S; Bosworth, HB
MLA Citation
Zullig, Leah L., et al. “Cardiovascular disease-related chronic conditions among Veterans Affairs nonmetastatic colorectal cancer survivors: a matched case-control analysis..” Cancer Manag Res, vol. 11, 2019, pp. 6793–802. Pubmed, doi:10.2147/CMAR.S191040.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1404026
PMID
31413631
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Management and Research
Volume
11
Published Date
Start Page
6793
End Page
6802
DOI
10.2147/CMAR.S191040

Next steps to improve disparities in lung cancer treatment clinical trial enrollment.

Authors
Zullig, LL; Carpenter, WR; Williams, CD
MLA Citation
Zullig, Leah L., et al. “Next steps to improve disparities in lung cancer treatment clinical trial enrollment..” Ann Transl Med, vol. 5, no. 5, Mar. 2017. Pubmed, doi:10.21037/atm.2017.01.25.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1243353
PMID
28361083
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Translational Medicine
Volume
5
Published Date
Start Page
118
DOI
10.21037/atm.2017.01.25

Dietary calcium and risk for prostate cancer: a case-control study among US veterans.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the association between calcium intake and prostate cancer risk. We hypothesized that calcium intake would be positively associated with lower risk for prostate cancer. METHODS: We used data from a case-control study conducted among veterans between 2007 and 2010 at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The study consisted of 108 biopsy-positive prostate cancer cases, 161 biopsy-negative controls, and 237 healthy controls. We also determined whether these associations differed for blacks and whites or for low-grade (Gleason score <7) and high-grade prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥7). We administered the Harvard food frequency questionnaire to assess diet and estimate calcium intake. We used logistic regression models to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Intake of calcium from food was inversely related to risk for prostate cancer among all races in a comparison of cases and biopsy-negative controls (P = .05) and cases and healthy controls (P = .02). Total calcium was associated with lower prostate cancer risk among black men but not among white men in analyses of healthy controls. The highest tertile of calcium from food was associated with lower risk for high-grade prostate cancer in a comparison of high-grade cases and biopsy-negative controls (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.15-0.90) and high-grade cases and healthy controls (OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.17-0.86). CONCLUSION: Calcium from food is associated with lower risk for prostate cancer, particularly among black men, and lower risk for high-grade prostate cancer among all men.
Authors
Williams, CD; Whitley, BM; Hoyo, C; Grant, DJ; Schwartz, GG; Presti, JC; Iraggi, JD; Newman, KA; Gerber, L; Taylor, LA; McKeever, MG; Freedland, SJ
MLA Citation
Williams, Christina D., et al. “Dietary calcium and risk for prostate cancer: a case-control study among US veterans..” Prev Chronic Dis, vol. 9, 2012. Pubmed, doi:10.5888/pcd9.110125.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub771837
PMID
22239754
Source
pubmed
Published In
Preventing Chronic Disease
Volume
9
Published Date
Start Page
E39
DOI
10.5888/pcd9.110125

Use of NCCN Guidelines, Other Guidelines, and Biomarkers for Colorectal Cancer Screening.

Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a common cancer and significant public health burden. CRC-related mortality is declining, partly due to the early detection of CRC through robust screening. NCCN has established the NCCN Guidelines for CRC Screening to help healthcare providers make appropriate screening recommendations according to the patient's risk of developing CRC. This review describes the evolution of CRC screening guidelines for average-risk individuals, discusses the role of NCCN Guidelines for CRC Screening in cancer prevention, and comments on the current and emerging use of biomarkers for CRC screening.
Authors
MLA Citation
Williams, Christina D., et al. “Use of NCCN Guidelines, Other Guidelines, and Biomarkers for Colorectal Cancer Screening..” J Natl Compr Canc Netw, vol. 14, no. 11, Nov. 2016, pp. 1479–85. Pubmed, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2016.0154.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1151240
PMID
27799515
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Natl Compr Canc Netw
Volume
14
Published Date
Start Page
1479
End Page
1485
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2016.0154