Junfeng Zhang

Overview:

Dr. Zhang joined the Duke Faculty in fall 2013 from the University of Southern California where he had been a professor of environmental and global health and the director of Environmental and Biomarkers Analysis Laboratory since 2010. His prior positions include professor, department chair, and associate dean at the Rutgers School of Public Health. Dr. Zhang has more than 140 peer-reviewed publications. His work has been featured in major international media such as the Time, the New York Times, BBC, ABC, CBS, Yahoo News, etc. His early work on characterizing sources of non-methane greenhouse gases made him one of the officially recognized contributor to the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize awarded to IPCC. He is the 2012 recipient of the Jeremy Wesolowski Award, the highest award of the International Society of Exposure Science. He also received a Distinguished Alumni Award from the Rutgers Graduate School.

Dr. Zhang’s research interests include developing novel biomarkers of human exposure and health effects, assessing health and climate co-benefits of air pollution interventions, and examining biological mechanisms by which environmental exposures exert adverse health effects. Dr. Zhang has led a number of international collaborations to study air pollution health effects and underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. He is currently leading two multidisciplinary, multi-institutional centers studying the health impact of engineered nanomaterials.

Positions:

Professor of Global and Environmental Health

Environmental Sciences and Policy
Nicholas School of the Environment

Research Professor of Global Health

Duke Global Health Institute
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 1994

Rutgers University

Grants:

Cooperative Program in Nanomaterials Hazard and Exposure Assessment Traineeships (NanoHEAT)

Administered By
Pratt School of Engineering
Awarded By
Environmental Protection Agency
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

Effects of perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS) exposure on adverse pregnancy outcomes and fetal development

Administered By
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Reproductive Sciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

The effect of household air pollution on the health outcomes of infants in Botswana

Administered By
Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
Awarded By
Thrasher Research Fund
Role
Co-Mentor
Start Date
End Date

Measurement of urinary 8-isoprostane and 11-dehydrothromboxane

Administered By
Duke Global Health Institute
Awarded By
University of California - San Francisco
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Air Pollution Particle Effects on Human Lung Antimycobacterial Immunity

Administered By
Duke Global Health Institute
Awarded By
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Boiler Briquette Coal versus Raw Coal: Part II-Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Air Quality Implications.

The objective of this paper is to conduct an integrated analysis of the energy, greenhouse gas, and air quality impacts of a new type of boiler briquette coal (BB-coal) in contrast to those of the raw coal from which the BB-coal was formulated (R-coal). The analysis is based on the source emissions data and other relevant data collected in the present study and employs approaches including the construction of carbon, energy, and sulfur balances. The results show that replacing R-coal with BB-coal as the fuel for boilers such as the one tested would have multiple benefits, including a 37% increase in boiler thermal efficiency, a 25% reduction in fuel demand, a 26% reduction in CO2 emission, a 17% reduction in CO emission, a 63% reduction in SO2 emission, a 97% reduction in fly ash and fly ash carbon emission, a 22% reduction in PM2.5 mass emission, and a 30% reduction in total emission of five toxic hazardous air pollutant (HAP) metals contained in PM10. These benefits can be achieved with no changes in boiler hardware and with a relatively small amount of tradeoffs: a 30% increase in PM10 mass emission and a 9-16% increase in fuel cost.
Authors
Zhang, J; Ge, S; Bai, Z
MLA Citation
Zhang, Junfeng, et al. “Boiler Briquette Coal versus Raw Coal: Part II-Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Air Quality Implications.Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association (1995), vol. 51, no. 4, Apr. 2001, pp. 534–41. Epmc, doi:10.1080/10473289.2001.10464294.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1446681
PMID
28072240
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association (1995)
Volume
51
Published Date
Start Page
534
End Page
541
DOI
10.1080/10473289.2001.10464294

Endogenous melatonin mediation of systemic inflammatory responses to ozone exposure in healthy adults.

BACKGROUND/AIM: Melatonin is a free radical scavenger and an anti-inflammatory biomolecule. Air pollution exposure has been associated with increased inflammatory responses. We hypothesize that endogenous melatonin plays a role in inflammatory responses to air pollution exposure. METHODS: We tested this hypothesis in a cohort of 53 healthy adults (22-52 years old, 16 women), none of whom were on melatonin supplementation. Early morning urine and fasting blood were collected from each participant longitudinally up to three times. We analyzed urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), as a surrogate of circulating melatonin, and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the plasma samples. Indoor and outdoor air pollutants were measured and combined with participants' time-activity patterns to calculate personal exposure to O3, PM2.5, NO2, and SO2 averaged over 12-hour, 24-hour, 1-week, and 2-week periods prior to biospecimen collection, respectively. Linear mixed-effects models were used to examine the relationships among urinary aMT6s, personal pollutant exposure, and plasma cytokines. A mediation analysis was conducted to examine the role of aMT6s in the relationships between pollutant exposures and inflammatory cytokines. RESULTS: One interquartile range (4.2 ppb) increase in 2-week O3 exposure was associated with a -26.2% (95% CI: -43.9% to -2.8%) decrease in aMT6s. Within the range of endogenous aMT6s concentrations (0.5-53.0 ng/ng creatinine) across the participants, increased aMT6s was associated with decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-8, IL-17A, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. These cytokines were significantly and positively associated with 2-week average O3 exposure. Furthermore, 7.4% to 17.4% of the O3-cytokine associations were mediated by aMT6s. We did not find similar effects for the other pollutants. CONCLUSIONS: Pro-inflammatory responses to O3 exposure in the preceding 2 weeks partly resulted from the depletion of endogenous melatonin by O3.
Authors
He, L; Hu, X; Gong, J; Day, D; Xiang, J; Mo, J; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
He, Linchen, et al. “Endogenous melatonin mediation of systemic inflammatory responses to ozone exposure in healthy adults.Sci Total Environ, vol. 749, Aug. 2020, p. 141301. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.141301.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1456257
PMID
32829269
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Science of the Total Environment
Volume
749
Published Date
Start Page
141301
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.141301

Associations of personal exposure to air pollutants with airway mechanics in children with asthma.

BACKGROUND:The importance of airway mechanics has been increasingly recognized in pediatric asthma. However, no studies have examined responses of airway mechanics to air pollution exposure in asthmatic children. METHODS:In this panel study involving indoor air filtration manipulation that created a large gradient of personal exposure to PM2.5, the airway mechanics and lung function of 43 asthmatic children 5-13 years old in a suburb of Shanghai were measured four times within 3 consecutive months. Concentrations of indoor and outdoor PM2.5 and ozone were coupled with individual time-activity data to calculate personal exposures. Linear mixed effects models were used to examine the relationships of personal exposure with indicators of airway mechanics and lung function, respectively. RESULTS:An interquartile range (IQR) increase in 24-hour average PM2.5 personal exposure (30.3 µg/m3) in the prior day was associated with significant increases in small airway resistance (R5-R20) of 15.8%, total airway resistance (R5) of 6.3%, and airway inflammation (FeNO) of 9.6%. These associations were stronger in children with lower blood eosinophil counts (<450/µL). No significant associations were found between personal PM2.5 exposure and lung function. Low-level ozone exposure (daily maximum 8-hour exposure range 1.1-56.4 ppb) was not significantly associated with any of the outcomes. CONCLUSION:Changes in personal PM2.5 exposure, partly enhanced by air filtration, were associated with significant changes in airway resistance and inflammation in children with asthma. These findings suggest the importance of reducing PM2.5 exposure, via personal air quality management, in improving airflow limitation in the airways, especially the small airways.
Authors
He, L; Li, Z; Teng, Y; Cui, X; Barkjohn, KK; Norris, C; Fang, L; Lin, L; Wang, Q; Zhou, X; Hong, J; Li, F; Zhang, Y; Schauer, JJ; Black, M; Bergin, MH; Zhang, JJ
MLA Citation
He, Linchen, et al. “Associations of personal exposure to air pollutants with airway mechanics in children with asthma.Environment International, vol. 138, May 2020, p. 105647. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.envint.2020.105647.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434780
PMID
32172043
Source
epmc
Published In
Environ Int
Volume
138
Published Date
Start Page
105647
DOI
10.1016/j.envint.2020.105647

Urban airborne particle exposure impairs human lung and blood Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunity.

RATIONALE:Associations between urban (outdoor) airborne particulate matter (PM) exposure and TB and potential biological mechanisms are poorly explored. OBJECTIVES:To examine whether in vivo exposure to urban outdoor PM in Mexico City and in vitro exposure to urban outdoor PM2.5 (< 2.5 µm median aerodynamic diameter) alters human host immune cell responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. METHODS:Cellular toxicity (flow cytometry, proliferation assay (MTS assay)), M. tuberculosis and PM2.5 phagocytosis (microscopy), cytokine-producing cells (Enzyme-linked immune absorbent spot (ELISPOT)), and signalling pathway markers (western blot) were examined in bronchoalveolar cells (BAC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy, non-smoking, residents of Mexico City (n=35; 13 female, 22 male). In vivo-acquired PM burden in alveolar macrophages (AM) was measured by digital image analysis. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:In vitro exposure of AM to PM2.5 did not affect M. tuberculosis phagocytosis. High in vivo-acquired AM PM burden reduced constitutive, M. tuberculosis and PM-induced interleukin-1β production in freshly isolated BAC but not in autologous PBMC while it reduced constitutive production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha in both BAC and PBMC. Further, PM burden was positively correlated with constitutive, PM, M. tuberculosis and purified protein derivative (PPD)-induced interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in BAC, and negatively correlated with PPD-induced IFN-γ in PBMC. CONCLUSIONS:Inhalation exposure to urban air pollution PM impairs important components of the protective human lung and systemic immune response against M. tuberculosis. PM load in AM is correlated with altered M. tuberculosis-induced cytokine production in the lung and systemic compartments. Chronic PM exposure with high constitutive expression of proinflammatory cytokines results in relative cellular unresponsiveness.
Authors
Torres, M; Carranza, C; Sarkar, S; Gonzalez, Y; Osornio Vargas, A; Black, K; Meng, Q; Quintana-Belmares, R; Hernandez, M; Angeles Garcia, JJF; Páramo-Figueroa, VH; Iñiguez-Garcia, MA; Flores, JL; Zhang, JJ; Gardner, CR; Ohman-Strickland, P; Schwander, S
MLA Citation
Torres, Martha, et al. “Urban airborne particle exposure impairs human lung and blood Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunity.Thorax, vol. 74, no. 7, July 2019, pp. 675–83. Epmc, doi:10.1136/thoraxjnl-2018-212529.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1383731
PMID
31036772
Source
epmc
Published In
Thorax
Volume
74
Published Date
Start Page
675
End Page
683
DOI
10.1136/thoraxjnl-2018-212529

Factors associated with quality of life among married women in rural China: a cross-sectional study.

PURPOSE:Specific medical and living conditions in rural China may predispose people there to a poor quality of life. This study aimed to evaluate factors affecting the quality of life among married women in rural China. METHODS:This cross-sectional study was conducted in rural areas of Liaoning Province in China. Out of the 3900 married women, 3163 (81%) completed the questionnaire survey. Quality of life was assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF scale. Sociodemographic factors, such as monthly income, and living and health conditions, such as left-behind status, stress (quantified by the Perceived Stress Scale), and coping styles (assessed by the Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire) were collected through self-reported questionnaires. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to explore the factors related to quality of life. RESULTS:The mean scores of quality of life were 14.08 ± 2.27 for the domain of physical health, 11.78 ± 2.28 for psychological health, 13.07 ± 2.69 for social relationships, and 12.26 ± 2.67 for environmental conditions. Older age, having chronic diseases, being left-behind, sense of marriage insecurity, and stress were all negatively associated with quality of life scores, whereas a higher monthly income was associated with higher scores. Coping styles could be moderating factors in the relationship between stress and quality of life. CONCLUSIONS:Overall, married women living in rural China had relatively low scores for quality of life. Improving family income, providing access to affordable and high-quality medical care, facilitating couple communication, and promoting active coping styles could be intervention strategies to improve the quality of life of these rural residents.
Authors
Huang, H; Liu, S; Cui, X; Zhang, J; Wu, H
MLA Citation
Huang, Hao, et al. “Factors associated with quality of life among married women in rural China: a cross-sectional study.Quality of Life Research : An International Journal of Quality of Life Aspects of Treatment, Care and Rehabilitation, vol. 27, no. 12, Dec. 2018, pp. 3255–63. Epmc, doi:10.1007/s11136-018-1944-y.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1334922
PMID
30032339
Source
epmc
Published In
Quality of Life Research
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
3255
End Page
3263
DOI
10.1007/s11136-018-1944-y