Tian Zhang

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2009

Harvard Medical School

M.H.S. 2019

Duke University School of Medicine

Internal Medicine Residency, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Fellowship in Hematology-Oncology, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

MM-310-01-01-01: A Phase 1 Study Evaluating the Safety, Pharmacology and Preliminary Activity of MM-310 in Patients with Solid Tumors

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Merrimack Pharmaceuticals
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

An Open-Label Study of Rovalpituzumab Tesirine in Subjects with Delta-Like Protein 3-Expressing Advanced Solid Tumors

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
AbbVie Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A first in human study of repeat dosing with REGN2810 a fully human antibody to programmed death - 1 (PD-1) as single therapy and in combination with selected

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase II study of AGS-16C3F vs Axitinib in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Astellas Pharma Global Development, Inc
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase I/II open label multicenter study of the safety and efficacy of LAG525 single agent in combination with PDR001 adminitered to patients

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

A prospective trial of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone in Black and White men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

BACKGROUND: Retrospective analyses of randomized trials suggest that Black men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) have longer survival than White men. The authors conducted a prospective study of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone to explore outcomes by race. METHODS: This race-stratified, multicenter study estimated radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) in Black and White men with mCRPC. Secondary end points included prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics, overall survival (OS), and safety. Exploratory analysis included genome-wide genotyping to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with progression in a model incorporating genetic ancestry. One hundred patients self-identified as White (n = 50) or Black (n = 50) were enrolled. Eligibility criteria were modified to facilitate the enrollment of individual Black patients. RESULTS: The median rPFS for Black and White patients was 16.6 and 16.8 months, respectively; their times to PSA progression (TTP) were 16.6 and 11.5 months, respectively; and their OS was 35.9 and 35.7 months, respectively. Estimated rates of PSA decline by ≥50% in Black and White patients were 74% and 66%, respectively; and PSA declines to <0.2 ng/mL were 26% and 10%, respectively. Rates of grade 3 and 4 hypertension, hypokalemia, and hyperglycemia were higher in Black men. CONCLUSIONS: Multicenter prospective studies by race are feasible in men with mCRPC but require less restrictive eligibility. Despite higher comorbidity rates, Black patients demonstrated rPFS and OS similar to those of White patients and trended toward greater TTP and PSA declines, consistent with retrospective reports. Importantly, Black men may have higher side-effect rates than White men. This exploratory genome-wide analysis of TTP identified a possible candidate marker of ancestry-dependent treatment outcomes.
Authors
George, DJ; Halabi, S; Heath, EI; Sartor, AO; Sonpavde, GP; Das, D; Bitting, RL; Berry, W; Healy, P; Anand, M; Winters, C; Riggan, C; Kephart, J; Wilder, R; Shobe, K; Rasmussen, J; Milowsky, MI; Fleming, MT; Bearden, J; Goodman, M; Zhang, T; Harrison, MR; McNamara, M; Zhang, D; LaCroix, BL; Kittles, RA; Patierno, BM; Sibley, AB; Patierno, SR; Owzar, K; Hyslop, T; Freedman, JA; Armstrong, AJ
MLA Citation
George, Daniel J., et al. “A prospective trial of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone in Black and White men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer.Cancer, vol. 127, no. 16, Aug. 2021, pp. 2954–65. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.33589.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1481831
PMID
33951180
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
127
Published Date
Start Page
2954
End Page
2965
DOI
10.1002/cncr.33589

387 A Phase II, multicenter study of the safety and efficacy of LAG525 in combination with spartalizumab in patients with advanced malignancies

<jats:sec><jats:title>Background</jats:title><jats:p>Expression of LAG-3, an inhibitory immunoreceptor, has been linked to reduced T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. LAG525 is a humanized IgG4 anti-LAG-3 antibody which inhibits LAG-3 binding to MHC class II. Spartalizumab is a humanized IgG4 anti-PD-1 mAb which inhibits PD-1 binding with its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2. Preclinical data have shown promising antitumor activity when blocking LAG-3 and PD-1.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>The Phase II part of the first-in-human study (<jats:ext-link xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" ext-link-type="clintrialgov" xlink:href="NCT02460224">NCT02460224</jats:ext-link>) explored LAG525 + spartalizumab in patients with advanced/metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), cutaneous and non-cutaneous melanoma, renal cell carcinoma (RCC), mesothelioma, or triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). The dose/schedule of LAG525 and spartalizumab was 400 mg IV Q3W and 300 mg IV Q3W, respectively. Half of patients with TNBC naïve to anti-PD-1/PD-L1 received LAG525 at 600 mg IV Q4W and spartalizumab at 400 mg IV Q4W. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR) using RECIST v1.1.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>As of June 1, 2020, 235 patients were enrolled in the Phase II part of the study, including patients with NSCLC (n=42), melanoma (n=42), RCC (n=38), mesothelioma (n=57), or TNBC (n=56). In total, 142 patients were naïve to, and 93 patients were pretreated with, PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors. Overall, 232 patients (99%) discontinued treatment, 76% due to progressive disease.ORR and disease control rate by indication and prior anti-PD-1/PD-L1 treatment are summarized below (table 1). Best overall response was 3 (1.3%) CR, 23 (9.8%) PR, 84 (35.7%) SD, 95 (40.4%) PD, and 30 (12.8%) unknown. For patients naïve to anti-PD-1/PD-L1, median progression free survival (mPFS) in months (90% CI) was 3.9 (1.7–5.6) for NSCLC, 2.2 (1.6–5.6) for melanoma, 4.4 (2.1–11.1) for RCC, 5.5 (3.5–6.4) for mesothelioma, and 1.9 (1.6–2.6) for TNBC. For patients pretreated with anti-PD-1/PD-L1, mPFS in months (90% CI) was 3.5 (1.9–4.9) for NSCLC, 1.9 (1.8–3.7) for melanoma, 3.0 (1.6–3.9) for RCC, 3.4 (1.8–3.8) for mesothelioma, and 1.7 (1.3–3.4) for TNBC. Adverse events of any grade, regardless of cause, were reported in 233 (99%) patients; the most common (occurring in &gt;20%) were nausea (25%), fatigue (23%), and dyspnea (21%).</jats:p><jats:table-wrap id="T1" position="float" orientation="portrait"><jats:label>Abstract 387 Table 1</jats:label><jats:caption><jats:p>Overall response rate (ORR: CR + PR) and disease control rate (DCR: CR + PR + SD) per RECIST v1.1 by indication and prior anti-PD-1/PD-L1 treatment</jats:p></jats:caption><jats:graphic xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xlink:href="ABS_387_T001" position="float" orientation="portrait" /></jats:table-wrap></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>LAG525 + spartalizumab exhibited antitumor activity across different indications, including patients with melanoma, RCC, and mesothelioma who had been pretreated with PD-1/-L1 inhibitors, suggesting that this combination may salvage prior PD-1/-L1 resistance. The combination was well tolerated, and no new safety signals were observed. Biomarker analysis is ongoing.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Trial Registration</jats:title><jats:p>NCT02460224</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Ethics Approval</jats:title><jats:p>This study was approved by an independent ethics committee or institutional review board at each site.</jats:p></jats:sec>
Authors
Lin, C-C; Garralda, E; Schöffski, P; Hong, D; Siu, L; Martin, M; Maur, M; Hui, R; Soo, R; Chiu, J; Zhang, T; Ma, B; Kyi, C; Tan, D; Cassier, P; Sarantopoulos, J; Weickhardt, A; Carvajal, R; Spratlin, J; Esaki, T; Rolland, F; Akerley, W; Deschler-Baier, B; Sabatos-Peyton, C; Chowdhury, NR; Gusenleitner, D; Kwak, E; Askoxylakis, V; Braud, FD
MLA Citation
Lin, Chia-Chi, et al. “387 A Phase II, multicenter study of the safety and efficacy of LAG525 in combination with spartalizumab in patients with advanced malignancies.” Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer, vol. 8, no. Suppl 3, BMJ, 2020, pp. A412–A412. Crossref, doi:10.1136/jitc-2020-sitc2020.0387.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1475821
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
A412
End Page
A412
DOI
10.1136/jitc-2020-sitc2020.0387

ApricityRx companion digital therapeutic for evidence-based mitigation and phenotype-linked molecular characterization of irAEs in patients receiving immune checkpoint therapy (ICT).

Authors
Campbell, MT; Zhang, T; Chin, L; Warner, AB; Mathew, M
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1475819
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
38
Published Date

Association of clinical factors and recent anticancer therapy with COVID-19 severity among patients with cancer: a report from the COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium.

BACKGROUND: Patients with cancer may be at high risk of adverse outcomes from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. We analyzed a cohort of patients with cancer and coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) reported to the COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19) to identify prognostic clinical factors, including laboratory measurements and anticancer therapies. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with active or historical cancer and a laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis recorded between 17 March and 18 November 2020 were included. The primary outcome was COVID-19 severity measured on an ordinal scale (uncomplicated, hospitalized, admitted to intensive care unit, mechanically ventilated, died within 30 days). Multivariable regression models included demographics, cancer status, anticancer therapy and timing, COVID-19-directed therapies, and laboratory measurements (among hospitalized patients). RESULTS: A total of 4966 patients were included (median age 66 years, 51% female, 50% non-Hispanic white); 2872 (58%) were hospitalized and 695 (14%) died; 61% had cancer that was present, diagnosed, or treated within the year prior to COVID-19 diagnosis. Older age, male sex, obesity, cardiovascular and pulmonary comorbidities, renal disease, diabetes mellitus, non-Hispanic black race, Hispanic ethnicity, worse Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, recent cytotoxic chemotherapy, and hematologic malignancy were associated with higher COVID-19 severity. Among hospitalized patients, low or high absolute lymphocyte count; high absolute neutrophil count; low platelet count; abnormal creatinine; troponin; lactate dehydrogenase; and C-reactive protein were associated with higher COVID-19 severity. Patients diagnosed early in the COVID-19 pandemic (January-April 2020) had worse outcomes than those diagnosed later. Specific anticancer therapies (e.g. R-CHOP, platinum combined with etoposide, and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors) were associated with high 30-day all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical factors (e.g. older age, hematological malignancy, recent chemotherapy) and laboratory measurements were associated with poor outcomes among patients with cancer and COVID-19. Although further studies are needed, caution may be required in utilizing particular anticancer therapies. CLINICAL TRIAL IDENTIFIER: NCT04354701.
Authors
Grivas, P; Khaki, AR; Wise-Draper, TM; French, B; Hennessy, C; Hsu, C-Y; Shyr, Y; Li, X; Choueiri, TK; Painter, CA; Peters, S; Rini, BI; Thompson, MA; Mishra, S; Rivera, DR; Acoba, JD; Abidi, MZ; Bakouny, Z; Bashir, B; Bekaii-Saab, T; Berg, S; Bernicker, EH; Bilen, MA; Bindal, P; Bishnoi, R; Bouganim, N; Bowles, DW; Cabal, A; Caimi, PF; Chism, DD; Crowell, J; Curran, C; Desai, A; Dixon, B; Doroshow, DB; Durbin, EB; Elkrief, A; Farmakiotis, D; Fazio, A; Fecher, LA; Flora, DB; Friese, CR; Fu, J; Gadgeel, SM; Galsky, MD; Gill, DM; Glover, MJ; Goyal, S; Grover, P; Gulati, S; Gupta, S; Halabi, S; Halfdanarson, TR; Halmos, B; Hausrath, DJ; Hawley, JE; Hsu, E; Huynh-Le, M; Hwang, C; Jani, C; Jayaraj, A; Johnson, DB; Kasi, A; Khan, H; Koshkin, VS; Kuderer, NM; Kwon, DH; Lammers, PE; Li, A; Loaiza-Bonilla, A; Low, CA; Lustberg, MB; Lyman, GH; McKay, RR; McNair, C; Menon, H; Mesa, RA; Mico, V; Mundt, D; Nagaraj, G; Nakasone, ES; Nakayama, J; Nizam, A; Nock, NL; Park, C; Patel, JM; Patel, KG; Peddi, P; Pennell, NA; Piper-Vallillo, AJ; Puc, M; Ravindranathan, D; Reeves, ME; Reuben, DY; Rosenstein, L; Rosovsky, RP; Rubinstein, SM; Salazar, M; Schmidt, AL; Schwartz, GK; Shah, MR; Shah, SA; Shah, C; Shaya, JA; Singh, SRK; Smits, M; Stockerl-Goldstein, KE; Stover, DG; Streckfuss, M; Subbiah, S; Tachiki, L; Tadesse, E; Thakkar, A; Tucker, MD; Verma, AK; Vinh, DC; Weiss, M; Wu, JT; Wulff-Burchfield, E; Xie, Z; Yu, PP; Zhang, T; Zhou, AY; Zhu, H; Zubiri, L; Shah, DP; Warner, JL; Lopes, G
MLA Citation
Grivas, P., et al. “Association of clinical factors and recent anticancer therapy with COVID-19 severity among patients with cancer: a report from the COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium.Ann Oncol, vol. 32, no. 6, June 2021, pp. 787–800. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2021.02.024.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1476684
PMID
33746047
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ann Oncol
Volume
32
Published Date
Start Page
787
End Page
800
DOI
10.1016/j.annonc.2021.02.024

Disparities in utilization of oral anticancer agents and related costs in elderly patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the United States.

Authors
Wilson, LE; Spees, L; Pritchard, J; Greiner, MA; Scales, CD; Baggett, C; Kaye, D; George, DJ; Zhang, T; Wheeler, SB; Dinan, MA
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1473505
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
38
Published Date