Tian Zhang

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2009

Harvard Medical School

M.H.S. 2019

Duke University School of Medicine

Internal Medicine Residency, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Fellowship in Hematology-Oncology, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

Duke-UNC-Wash U Partnership for Early Phase Clinical Trials in Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Significant Contributor
Start Date
End Date

Defining the Relevant Immune Checkpoints Expressed on Metastatic Prostate Cancer Circulating Tumor Cells

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Conditional lethality of copper and disulfiram as a therapeutic modality for prostate cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase III, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) as Monotherapy in the Adjuvant Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma Post Nephrectomy (KEYNOTE-564)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Salvage Trial of AR Inhibition with ADT and Apalutamide with Docetaxel followed by Radiation Therapy in Men with PSA Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy (¿STARTAR¿)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Checking the Hippo in Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma with Immunotherapy.

Subset analysis of patients with sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma (sRCC) included in the CheckMate 214 trial of ipilimumab-nivolumab versus sunitinib showed improved outcomes in sRCC with ipilimumab-nivolumab. The use of checkpoint inhibitor-based regimens in sRCC, for which therapeutic options were once limited, is further supported by additional clinical trials.See related article by Tannir et al., p. 78.
Authors
Hwang, JK; Agarwal, N; Brugarolas, J; Zhang, T
MLA Citation
Hwang, Joyce K., et al. “Checking the Hippo in Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma with Immunotherapy.Clin Cancer Res, vol. 27, no. 1, Jan. 2021, pp. 5–7. Pubmed, doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-20-3506.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1463311
PMID
33106290
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
5
End Page
7
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-20-3506

Patient preferences and expectations of systemic therapy in renal cell carcinoma.

Authors
Battle, D; Bergerot, CD; Msaouel, P; Jonasch, E; Zhang, T; George, DJ; Staehler, MD
MLA Citation
Battle, Dena, et al. “Patient preferences and expectations of systemic therapy in renal cell carcinoma.Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 38, no. 15, 2020.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1468156
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
38
Published Date

Early Bone Metastases are Associated with Worse Outcomes in Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma

BACKGROUND: Outcomes of patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma (mUC) with early bone metastases (eBM) vs no early bone metastases (nBM) have not thoroughly been described in the age of immuno-oncology. OBJECTIVE: To compare survival and other clinical outcomes in patients with eBM and nBM. METHODS: We used a multi-institutional database of patients with mUC treated with systemic therapy. Demographic, metastatic site, treatment patterns, and clinical outcomes were recorded. Wilcoxon rank-sum, chi-square tests were performed. Survival was estimated by Kaplan-Meier method; multivariable Cox analysis was performed. RESULTS: We identified 270 pts, 67% men, mean age 69±11 years. At metastatic diagnosis, 27% had≥1 eBM and were more likely to have de novo vs. recurrent metastases (42% vs 19%, p < 0.001). Patients with eBM had shorter overall survival (OS) vs. those with nBM, (6.1 vs 13.7 months, p < 0.0001). On multivariable analysis, eBM independently associated with higher risk of death, HR = 2.52 (95% CI: 1.75-3.63, p < 0.0001). OS was shorter for patients with eBM who received initial immune checkpoint inhibitor vs platinum-based chemotherapy, (1.6 vs 9.1 months, p = 0.02). Patients with eBM received higher opioid analgesic doses compared to patients with nBM and received quantitatively more palliative radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with mUC and eBM have poorer outcomes, may benefit less from anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy and represent an unmet need for novel therapeutic interventions. Dedicated clinical trials, biomarker validation to assist in patient selection, as well as consensus on reporting of non-measurable disease are required.
Authors
Nelson, AA; Cronk, RJ; Lemke, EA; Szabo, A; Khaki, AR; Diamantopoulos, LN; Grivas, P; Nezami, BG; MacLennan, GT; Zhang, T; Hoimes, CJ
MLA Citation
Nelson, A. A., et al. “Early Bone Metastases are Associated with Worse Outcomes in Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma.” Bladder Cancer, vol. 7, no. 1, Jan. 2021, pp. 33–42. Scopus, doi:10.3233/BLC-200377.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1477687
Source
scopus
Published In
Bladder Cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Volume
7
Published Date
Start Page
33
End Page
42
DOI
10.3233/BLC-200377

The Immunotherapy Landscape in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

The past 30 years have borne witness to a gradual evolution in the treatment landscape of advanced renal cell carcinoma (aRCC). Early immunotherapy approaches such as interferon-α and high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) therapy in this immunogenic tumor provided durable responses in only a minority of patients and came with toxic side effects. A growing understanding of the tumor biology elucidated pathways of tumorigenesis, which in turn revealed novel targets amenable to targeted therapies. Inhibition of angiogenesis and cell signaling emerged as cornerstones of treatment with the approval of bevacizumab and several pan-kinase and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Though effective, their use has been limited by low rates of durable response, resistance, and side effects. The immunotherapy revolution of the past decade has led to immunotherapy-based combination regimens such as ipilimumab plus nivolumab, pembrolizumab plus axitinib, and avelumab plus axitinib, displacing single agent anti-angiogenic therapy in the first-line setting by demonstrating durable responses and improved survival over sunitinib. These immunotherapy-based combinations define first-line standard of care for aRCC today. The pipeline of second-line agents for consideration in patients who have disease progression despite immunotherapy regimens is robust but still in early stages of development.
Authors
Brown, LC; Desai, K; Zhang, T; Ornstein, MC
MLA Citation
Brown, Landon C., et al. “The Immunotherapy Landscape in Renal Cell Carcinoma.Biodrugs, vol. 34, no. 6, Dec. 2020, pp. 733–48. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s40259-020-00449-4.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1462315
PMID
33048299
Source
pubmed
Published In
Biodrugs
Volume
34
Published Date
Start Page
733
End Page
748
DOI
10.1007/s40259-020-00449-4

PDIGREE: An adaptive phase III trial of PD-inhibitor nivolumab and ipilimumab (IPI-NIVO) with VEGF TKI cabozantinib (CABO) in metastatic untreated renal cell cancer (Alliance A031704).

Authors
Zhang, T; Ballman, KV; Choudhury, AD; Chen, RC; Watt, C; Wen, Y; Shergill, A; Zemla, TJ; Emamekhoo, H; Vaishampayan, UN; Morris, MJ; George, DJ; Choueiri, TK
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1475818
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
38
Published Date