Mustafa Khasraw

Overview:

I am a Medical Oncologist and Neurooncologist at Duke's Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center.  I also work as the Deputy Director of the newly established Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, tasked to speed up clinical research and translation for scientists across all departments and across all tumor types at Duke, who have made discoveries that show promise for developing new immunotherapies.

Prior to joining Duke in September, 2019, I worked as a medical oncologist in Sydney, Australia and I was also as a Clinical Lead at the Australian National Health & Medical Research Council Clinical Trial Centre at The University of Sydney. 

I am leading several clinical and translational programs with significant laboratory collaborations. I am interested in innovative trials designed to improve outcome of cancer patients. I am lead principal investigator on phase I, II and III multi-center clinical trials for a number of pharmaceutical and academic groups. 

I serve as an advisor and grant reviewer for a number of non-profits and patient advocacy groups and I am a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians as well as an Elected Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians (Lon, UK). 

Positions:

Instructor in the Department of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2001

Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands)

Publications:

Defining the Supportive Care Needs and Psychological Morbidity of Patients With Functioning Versus Nonfunctioning Neuroendocrine Tumors: Protocol for a Phase 1 Trial of a Nurse-Led Online and Phone-Based Intervention.

BACKGROUND: Online information resources and support have been demonstrated to positively influence the well-being of people diagnosed with cancer. This has been explored in past literature for more common cancers; however, for rare cancers, such as neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), there are little to no support or resources available. Despite relatively good prognoses, the quality of life (QoL) of patients with NETs is significantly lower compared with samples of mixed cancer patients and the general population. Patients with NETs also typically report unclear and difficult pathways of disease management and treatment, given the heterogeneity of the diagnosis. There is a vital need to improve the availability of disease-specific information for this patient group and provide supportive care that is tailored to the unique needs of the NET patient population. OBJECTIVE: This study described the protocol of a study aimed to better understand the outcomes and experiences of patients diagnosed with NETs and to develop and pilot test a nurse-led online and phone-based intervention that will provide tailored supportive care targeted to NET subgroups (functioning vs nonfunctioning). METHODS: This is a multisite cohort with 3 phases, incorporating both quantitative and qualitative data collection. Phase 1 is a mixed methods prospective cohort study of NET patients identifying differences in patient experiences and priority of needs between NET subgroups. Phase 2 utilizes results from phase 1 to develop an online and nurse-led phone-based intervention. Phase 3 is to pilot test and evaluate the intervention's acceptability, appropriateness, and feasibility. RESULTS: Currently, the project is progressing through phase 1 and has completed recruitment. A total of 138 participants have been recruited to the study. To date, patient-reported outcome data from 123 participants at baseline and 87 participants at 6-month follow-up have been collected. Of these, qualitative data from semistructured interviews from 35 participants have also been obtained. Phase 2 and phase 3 of the project are yet to be completed. CONCLUSIONS: Limited research for patients with NETs suggests that QoL and patient experiences are significantly impaired compared with the general population. Furthermore, past research has failed to delineate how the clinical variability between those with functioning and nonfunctioning NETs impacts patient supportive care needs. This study will improve on the availability of disease-specific information as well as informing the design of a nurse-led online and phone-based supportive care intervention tailored for the unique needs of the NET patient population. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/14361.
Authors
Guccione, L; Gough, K; Drosdowsky, A; Fisher, K; Price, T; Pavlakis, N; Khasraw, M; Wyld, D; Ransom, D; Kong, G; Rogers, M; Leyden, S; Leyden, J; Michael, M; Schofield, P
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1423082
PMID
31793892
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jmir Research Protocols
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
e14361
DOI
10.2196/14361

Health-related quality of life (HRQL) in VERTU: A randomized phase II trial of veliparib (V), radiotherapy (RT), and temozolomide (TMZ) for newly diagnosed MGMT unmethylated (uMGMT) glioblastoma (GBM).

Authors
Sim, H-W; Barnes, E; Lwin, Z; Rosenthal, M; Wheeler, H; Koh, E-S; Foote, MC; Fisher, L; Leonard, R; Hall, M; Simes, J; Khasraw, M
MLA Citation
Sim, Hao-Wen, et al. “Health-related quality of life (HRQL) in VERTU: A randomized phase II trial of veliparib (V), radiotherapy (RT), and temozolomide (TMZ) for newly diagnosed MGMT unmethylated (uMGMT) glioblastoma (GBM)..” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 37, no. 15_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2019, pp. 2042–2042. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2019.37.15_suppl.2042.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1415253
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
37
Published Date
Start Page
2042
End Page
2042
DOI
10.1200/jco.2019.37.15_suppl.2042

NUTMEG: A randomised phase II study of nivolumab and temozolomide (TMZ) versus TMZ alone in elderly patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM): Trial in progress

Authors
Khasraw, M; McDonald, KL; Yip, S; Verhaak, R; Heimberger, A; Hall, M; Fisher, L; Barnes, E; Rosenthal, M; Gedye, C; Hovey, E; Ellingson, BM; Simes, J; Tongela, A; Wheeler, H; Koh, E-S; Gan, H; Back, M; Lwin, Z
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1405616
Source
wos
Published In
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
14
Published Date
Start Page
196
End Page
197

Efficacy and Safety of Sunitinib in Patients with Well-Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours.

BACKGROUND: In a phase III study, sunitinib led to a significant increase in progression-free survival (PFS) versus placebo in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (panNETs). This study was a post-marketing commitment to support the phase III data. METHODS: In this ongoing, open-label, phase IV trial (NCT01525550), patients with progressive, advanced unresectable/metastatic, well-differentiated panNETs received continuous sunitinib 37.5 mg once daily. Eligibility criteria were similar to those of the phase III study. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed PFS per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours v1.0 (RECIST). Other endpoints included PFS per Choi criteria, overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), and adverse events (AEs). RESULTS: Sixty-one treatment-naive and 45 previously treated patients received sunitinib. By March 19, 2016, 82 (77%) patients had discontinued treatment, mainly due to disease progression. Median treatment duration was 11.7 months. Investigator-assessed median PFS per RECIST (95% confidence interval [CI]) was 13.2 months (10.9-16.7): 13.2 (7.4-16.8) and 13.0 (9.2-20.4) in treatment-naive and previously treated patients, respectively. ORR (95% CI) per RECIST was 24.5% (16.7-33.8) in the total population: 21.3% (11.9-33.7) in treatment-naive and 28.9% (16.4-44.3) in previously treated patients. Median OS, although not yet mature, was 37.8 months (95% CI, 33.0-not estimable). The most common treatment-related AEs were neutropenia (53.8%), diarrhoea (46.2%), and leukopenia (43.4%). CONCLUSIONS: This phase IV trial confirms sunitinib as an efficacious and safe treatment option in patients with advanced/metastatic, well-differentiated, unresectable panNETs, and supports the phase III study outcomes. AEs were consistent with the known safety profile of sunitinib.
Authors
Raymond, E; Kulke, MH; Qin, S; Yu, X; Schenker, M; Cubillo, A; Lou, W; Tomasek, J; Thiis-Evensen, E; Xu, J-M; Croitoru, AE; Khasraw, M; Sedlackova, E; Borbath, I; Ruff, P; Oberstein, PE; Ito, T; Jia, L; Hammel, P; Shen, L; Shrikhande, SV; Shen, Y; Sufliarsky, J; Khan, GN; Morizane, C; Galdy, S; Khosravan, R; Fernandez, KC; Rosbrook, B; Fazio, N
MLA Citation
Raymond, Eric, et al. “Efficacy and Safety of Sunitinib in Patients with Well-Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours..” Neuroendocrinology, vol. 107, no. 3, 2018, pp. 237–45. Pubmed, doi:10.1159/000491999.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1405547
PMID
29991024
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuroendocrinology
Volume
107
Published Date
Start Page
237
End Page
245
DOI
10.1159/000491999

Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Gliomas.

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Malignant gliomas result in disproportionately high morbidity and mortality compared with other primary tumors, and progression of disease is inevitable. Novel therapies to improve outcomes are needed and immune checkpoint inhibitors hold significant promise. RECENT FINDINGS: A limited body of preclinical evidence suggests that checkpoint inhibitors may be effective treatment for gliomas. Biomarkers to identify characteristics of gliomas responsive to these therapies will be essential. These may include mismatch repair deficiency and high mutational load that might be germline, somatic, or acquired after therapy. Evidence on the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors in gliomas is evolving. Clinical trials are underway and results are eagerly awaited. Understanding the role of immune checkpoint inhibitors in combination with other treatment modalities for gliomas is crucial to the improvement of outcomes. The design and conduct of future clinical trials need to account for increasingly complex treatment options.
Authors
Tan, AC; Heimberger, AB; Khasraw, M
MLA Citation
Tan, Aaron C., et al. “Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Gliomas..” Curr Oncol Rep, vol. 19, no. 4, Apr. 2017. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s11912-017-0586-5.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1405565
PMID
28303490
Source
pubmed
Published In
Current Oncology Reports
Volume
19
Published Date
Start Page
23
DOI
10.1007/s11912-017-0586-5