Jenny Hoang

Overview:

Dr. Jenny K. Hoang MBBS is a neuroradiologist and Associate Professor in Radiology and Radiation Oncology at Duke University, NC USA where she is the Director of Head and Neck Radiology and Chair of the Grand Rounds Committee. Her career is accentuated by her strong involvement in research and education. She led the American College of Radiology (ACR) efforts in producing a White Paper on Incidental Thyroid Findings and was a core member of the ACR TI-RADS committee for thyroid ultrasound. She also serves on the National Cancer Institute PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board.

She has published more than 110 peer-reviewed articles with a focus on thyroid and parathyroid imaging. Dr. Hoang was the recipient of GE-Radiology Research Academic Fellowship (GERRAF) Program (2010-2012) and ACR Innovations Grant (2017). She is a popular a faculty lecturer at national and international meetings. She is also actively educating and advocating on Twitter. Connect with her at @JennyKHoang.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Radiology

Radiology, Neuroradiology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.B.B.S. 1999

University of Melbourne (Australia)

Grants:

From ACR White Papers to National Guidelines: Formalizing the Consensus Process for Algorithm-Based Recommendations

Administered By
Radiology, Neuroradiology
Awarded By
American College of Radiology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Incidental Thyroid Nodules Detected in the National Lung Screening Trial:

Administered By
Radiology
Role
Advisor
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Chest radiology

Authors
Heyneman, LE; Washington, L; Christensen, JD; Hoang, JK; Knutson, TM; Hoang, PB
MLA Citation
Heyneman, L. E., et al. “Chest radiology.” Duke Radiology Case Review: Imaging, Differential Diagnosis, and Discussion: 2nd Edition, 2012.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1136062
Source
scopus
Published Date
Start Page
1

CT mucosal window settings: a novel approach to evaluating early T-stage head and neck carcinoma.

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the CT densities of small head and neck mucosal cancers as a means of deriving a CT mucosal window display of narrower window width and higher window level to better detect and delineate head and neck carcinomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively studied 19 subjects with T1-2 head and neck carcinomas. The density of tumor and adjacent normal mucosa on CT were measured. CT scans for the 19 patients with tumors and 35 subjects without mucosal tumors were anonymized and interpreted by two readers using standard soft-tissue windows and were reviewed again 1 week later with the addition of mucosal windows. RESULTS: The mean (± SD) attenuation of 17 visible tumors was 85.5 ± 18.3 Hounsfield units (HU) and that of the surrounding normal mucosa was 55.3 ± 15.2 HU (p < 0.0001). From our data, we derived guideline mucosal window settings-a window width of 120 HU and a window level of 60 HU. On blinded review, reader A detected 12 tumors with the addition of mucosal windows (sensitivity, 63%; specificity, 82%) and nine tumors on soft-tissue windows alone (sensitivity, 47%; specificity, 94%). Reader B detected nine tumors with use of mucosal windows (sensitivity, 47%; specificity, 71%) and eight tumors on soft-tissue windows alone (sensitivity, 42%; specificity, 74%). CONCLUSION: Early T-stage tumors have higher CT density than normal mucosa. Their conspicuity can be amplified using display windows with narrower window width and higher window level. The potential clinical applications are for the improved detection of unknown primary tumors and delineation of a known mucosal tumor.
Authors
Hoang, JK; Glastonbury, CM; Chen, LF; Salvatore, JK; Eastwood, JD
MLA Citation
Hoang, Jenny K., et al. “CT mucosal window settings: a novel approach to evaluating early T-stage head and neck carcinoma..” Ajr Am J Roentgenol, vol. 195, no. 4, Oct. 2010, pp. 1002–06. Pubmed, doi:10.2214/AJR.09.4149.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub727772
PMID
20858831
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ajr. American Journal of Roentgenology
Volume
195
Published Date
Start Page
1002
End Page
1006
DOI
10.2214/AJR.09.4149

Multidetector CT pulmonary angiography features of pulmonary embolus.

Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a life-threatening condition. Multidetector CT pulmonary angiography is currently the imaging method of choice for the detection of PE. The aim of this pictorial essay is to review the appearances of PE on multidetector CT pulmonary angiography, including signs that differentiate acute and chronic PE and markers of severity. The features of a non-diagnostic study and pitfalls leading to a false-positive or false-negative study are presented.
Authors
Hoang, JK; Lee, WK; Hennessy, OF
MLA Citation
Hoang, J. K., et al. “Multidetector CT pulmonary angiography features of pulmonary embolus..” J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol, vol. 52, no. 4, Aug. 2008, pp. 307–17. Pubmed, doi:10.1111/j.1440-1673.2008.01961.x.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub708786
PMID
18811753
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol
Volume
52
Published Date
Start Page
307
End Page
317
DOI
10.1111/j.1440-1673.2008.01961.x

ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Thyroid Disease.

There are a wide variety of diseases that affect the thyroid gland ranging from hyperplastic to neoplastic, autoimmune, or inflammatory. They can present with functional abnormality or a palpable structural change. Imaging has a key role in diagnosing and characterizing the thyroid finding for management. Imaging is also essential in the management of thyroid cancer. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.
Authors
Expert Panel on Neurological Imaging:,; Hoang, JK; Oldan, JD; Mandel, SJ; Policeni, B; Agarwal, V; Burns, J; Bykowski, J; Harvey, HB; Juliano, AF; Kennedy, TA; Moonis, G; Pannell, JS; Parsons, MS; Schroeder, JW; Subramaniam, RM; Whitehead, MT; Corey, AS
MLA Citation
Expert Panel on Neurological Imaging:, Amanda S., et al. “ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Thyroid Disease..” J Am Coll Radiol, vol. 16, no. 5S, May 2019, pp. S300–14. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jacr.2019.02.004.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1381827
PMID
31054756
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American College of Radiology : Jacr
Volume
16
Published Date
Start Page
S300
End Page
S314
DOI
10.1016/j.jacr.2019.02.004

Cost-effectiveness analysis of a non-contrast screening MRI protocol for vestibular schwannoma in patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss.

PURPOSE: We aimed to determine if a non-contrast screening MRI is cost-effective compared to a full MRI protocol with contrast for the evaluation of vestibular schwannomas. METHODS: A decision tree was constructed to evaluate full MRI and screening MRI strategies for patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss. If a patient were to have a positive screening MRI, s/he received a full MRI. Vestibular schwannoma prevalence, MRI specificity and sensitivity, and gadolinium anaphylaxis incidence were obtained through literature review. Institutional charge data were obtained using representative patient cohorts. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were completed to determine CE model threshold points for MRI performance characteristics and charges. RESULTS: The mean charge for a full MRI with contrast was significantly higher than a screening MRI ($4089 ± 1086 versus $2872 ± 741; p < 0.05). The screening MRI protocol was more cost-effective than a full MRI protocol with a willingness-to-pay from $0 to 20,000 USD. Sensitivity analyses determined that the screening protocol dominated when the screening MRI charge was less than $4678, and the imaging specificity exceeded 78.2%. The screening MRI protocol also dominated when vestibular schwannoma prevalence was varied between 0 and 1000 in 10,000 people. CONCLUSION: A screening MRI protocol is more cost-effective than a full MRI with contrast in the diagnostic evaluation of a vestibular schwannoma. A screening MRI likely also confers benefits of shorter exam time and no contrast use. Further investigation is needed to confirm the relative performance of screening protocols for vestibular schwannomas.
Authors
Crowson, MG; Rocke, DJ; Hoang, JK; Weissman, JL; Kaylie, DM
MLA Citation
Crowson, Matthew G., et al. “Cost-effectiveness analysis of a non-contrast screening MRI protocol for vestibular schwannoma in patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss.Neuroradiology, vol. 59, no. 8, Aug. 2017, pp. 727–36. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00234-017-1859-2.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1262092
PMID
28623482
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuroradiology
Volume
59
Published Date
Start Page
727
End Page
736
DOI
10.1007/s00234-017-1859-2

Research Areas:

Abscess
Academic Medical Centers
Age Distribution
Anesthetics, Local
Angiogenesis Inhibitors
Angiography
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Aorta, Thoracic
Aortography
Arteries
Biopsy, Fine-Needle
Body Burden
Brain Ischemia
Brain Neoplasms
Calcinosis
Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating
Carcinoma, Papillary
Carcinoma, Renal Cell
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell
Carotid Artery, Internal
Case-Control Studies
Cervical Vertebrae
Chemoradiotherapy
Circle of Willis
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Disease
Documentation
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Electrocardiography
Eponyms
Fibromuscular Dysplasia
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography
Frontal Bone
Gallstones
Glioma
Glucose
Guideline Adherence
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Health Care Surveys
Hyperparathyroidism, Primary
Hyperthyroidism
Image Enhancement
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Immunohistochemistry
Incidental Findings
Injections
Injections, Epidural
Injections, Intra-Arterial
Injections, Intralesional
Injections, Intravenous
Jugular Veins
Kidney Neoplasms
Lymph Nodes
Lymphatic Metastasis
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Mammography
Mastoiditis
Myelography
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms
Neck
Nerve Block
Observer Variation
Oligodendroglioma
Organ Size
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parathyroid Neoplasms
Parotid Gland
Patient Safety
Petrous Bone
Phantoms, Imaging
Physician's Practice Patterns
Pneumonectomy
Positron-Emission Tomography
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Pulmonary Artery
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Protection
Radiculopathy
Radiographic Image Enhancement
Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Radiology
Radiotherapy, Conformal
Respiratory-Gated Imaging Techniques
Retropharyngeal Abscess
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Spinal Nerve Roots
Staphylococcal Infections
Statistics, Nonparametric
Streptococcal Infections
Stroke
Syndrome
Thrombophlebitis
Thyroid Diseases
Thyroid Gland
Thyroid Neoplasms
Thyroid Nodule
Thyroidectomy
Tomography, Spiral Computed
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Triiodobenzoic Acids
Tumor Burden
Ultrasonography
Young Adult