Jason Oliver

Overview:

Dr. Oliver is a clinical psychologist by training and is currently pursuing licensure in North Carolina. He received his graduate degree from the University of South Florida and completed his doctoral internship at Yale University School of Medicine. His research focuses on understanding of addictive behaviors, with a particular emphasis on tobacco use. His research program is heavily translational and includes both basic and clinical components. He has experience conducting human laboratory research, clinical trials and policy research. Long-term, he aims to identify new neural and behavioral markers for addiction that can serve as targets for novel interventions. 

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Addiction
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2015

University of South Florida

Grants:

Neurobehavioral substrates of propranolol's effects on drug cue reactivity

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Addiction
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Investigating the Effects of E-Cigarette Television Ads on Smokers

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Addiction
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Nicotine Withdrawal and Reward Processing: Connecting Neurobiology to Real-World Behavior

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Addiction
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Barriers and consultation needs regarding implementation of evidence-based treatment in community agencies.

There is growing recognition of the gap between research and practice in mental health settings, and community agencies now face significant pressure from multiple stakeholders to engage in evidence-based practices. Unfortunately, little is known about the barriers that exist among agencies involved in formal implementation efforts or their perceptions about how implementation experts can best support change. This study reports the results of a survey of 263 individuals across 32 agencies involved in a state-wide effort to increase access to an evidence-based trauma-focused treatment for children. Quantitative and qualitative results identified lack of time and secondary trauma as significant barriers to implementation and areas in which agencies desired consultation and support. Qualitative responses further suggested the importance of addressing client/structural barriers, staff turnover, and continued intervention training. Findings inform the development of a structured consultation process for community agencies focused on addressing the multiple barriers that can interfere with implementation of evidence-based treatment.
Authors
Oliver, JA; Lang, JM
MLA Citation
Oliver, Jason A., and Jason M. Lang. “Barriers and consultation needs regarding implementation of evidence-based treatment in community agencies.Children and Youth Services Review, vol. 94, Nov. 2018, pp. 368–77. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.10.004.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1356884
PMID
31289419
Source
epmc
Published In
Children and Youth Services Review
Volume
94
Published Date
Start Page
368
End Page
377
DOI
10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.10.004

Basic Science and Public Policy: Informed Regulation for Nicotine and Tobacco Products.

Introduction: Scientific discoveries over the past few decades have provided significant insight into the abuse liability and negative health consequences associated with tobacco and nicotine-containing products. While many of these advances have led to the development of policies and laws that regulate access to and formulations of these products, further research is critical to guide future regulatory efforts, especially as novel nicotine-containing products are introduced and selectively marketed to vulnerable populations. Discussion: In this narrative review, we provide an overview of the scientific findings that have impacted regulatory policy and discuss considerations for further translation of science into policy decisions. We propose that open, bidirectional communication between scientists and policy makers is essential to develop transformative preventive- and intervention-focused policies and programs to reduce appeal, abuse liability, and toxicity of the products. Conclusions: Through these types of interactions, collaborative efforts to inform and modify policy have the potential to significantly decrease the use of tobacco and alternative nicotine products and thus enhance health outcomes for individuals. Implications: This work addresses current topics in the nicotine and tobacco research field to emphasize the importance of basic science research and provide examples of how it can be utilized to inform public policy. In addition to relaying current thoughts on the topic from experts in the field, the article encourages continued efforts and communication between basic scientists and policy officials.
Authors
Fowler, CD; Gipson, CD; Kleykamp, BA; Rupprecht, LE; Harrell, PT; Rees, VW; Gould, TJ; Oliver, J; Bagdas, D; Damaj, MI; Schmidt, HD; Duncan, A; De Biasi, M; Basic Science Network (BSN) of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (SRNT),
MLA Citation
Fowler, Christie D., et al. “Basic Science and Public Policy: Informed Regulation for Nicotine and Tobacco Products.Nicotine Tob Res, vol. 20, no. 7, June 2018, pp. 789–99. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/ntr/ntx175.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1325057
PMID
29065200
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nicotine Tob Res
Volume
20
Published Date
Start Page
789
End Page
799
DOI
10.1093/ntr/ntx175

Digital envirotyping: quantifying environmental determinants of health and behavior.

Digital phenotyping efforts have used wearable devices to connect a rich array of physiologic data to health outcomes or behaviors of interest. The environmental context surrounding these phenomena has received less attention, yet is critically needed to understand their antecedents and deliver context-appropriate interventions. The coupling of improved smart eyewear with deep learning represents a technological turning point, one that calls for more comprehensive, ambitious study of environments and health.
Authors
Engelhard, MM; Oliver, JA; McClernon, FJ
MLA Citation
Engelhard, Matthew M., et al. “Digital envirotyping: quantifying environmental determinants of health and behavior.Npj Digit Med, vol. 3, 2020, p. 36. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41746-020-0245-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434686
PMID
32195371
Source
pubmed
Published In
Npj Digital Medicine
Volume
3
Published Date
Start Page
36
DOI
10.1038/s41746-020-0245-3

How much does love really hurt? Psychopathology and romantic relationships: A meta-analysis

<jats:sec id="S0924933800213990_abst0001" sec-type="intro"><jats:title>Introduction</jats:title><jats:p>Romantic relationship quality (RRQ) and break-ups (RRB) among young adults have been associated with the onset of a first major depressive episode or suicide attempts. However, the size of these associations varies across studies and the relative weight of RRB versus RRQ needs to be understood.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S0924933800213990_abst0002" sec-type="other"><jats:title>Objectives</jats:title><jats:p>To investigate (1) the size of the association between adolescent RRQ/RRB and psychopathology (i.e., depression, suicide ideation, deliberate self-harm, and suicide attempt); and (2) the role of potential moderators (e.g., gender, age, and nationality).</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S0924933800213990_abst0003" sec-type="methods"><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>A meta-analysis of 20 manuscripts reporting on 21 studies (<jats:italic>n</jats:italic> = 19623) was conducted, focusing specifically on adolescents and young adults. Studies focused on physically abusive relationships were excluded.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S0924933800213990_abst0004" sec-type="results"><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>A model combining relationship quality and break-up yielded a highly significant association between relationship measures and depression/self-harm but the strength of this relationship was modest (<jats:italic>r</jats:italic> = .229). The strength of the association between depression/self-harm and RRQ (<jats:italic>r</jats:italic> = .279) was statistically different from RRB (<jats:italic>r</jats:italic> = .145) (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = .006). Location (US vs. Non-US) had no effect. Age was not significant, B = -0.005, 95% CI [-0.026, 0.016], <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = .647. Gender was a weak moderator (B = .160, 95% CI [-0.021, 0.340], <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = .083).</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S0924933800213990_abst0005" sec-type="conclusions"><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>The association between psychopathology and RRQ/RRB was statistically significant but relatively small. RRQ was a stronger predictor of depression compared to RRB. This association was slightly stronger for women than for men. Implications for practice and future research will be discussed.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S0924933800213990_abst01" sec-type="other"><jats:title>Disclosure of interest</jats:title><jats:p>The authors have not supplied their declaration of competing interest.</jats:p></jats:sec>
Authors
Mirsu-Paun, A; Oliver, JA
MLA Citation
Mirsu-Paun, A., and J. A. Oliver. “How much does love really hurt? Psychopathology and romantic relationships: A meta-analysis.” European Psychiatry, vol. 41, no. S1, Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2017, pp. S696–S696. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.01.1225.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1278699
Source
crossref
Published In
European Psychiatry
Volume
41
Published Date
Start Page
S696
End Page
S696
DOI
10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.01.1225

How Much Does Love Really Hurt? A Meta-Analysis of the Association between Romantic Relationship Quality, Breakups and Mental Health Outcomes in Adolescents and Young Adults

Copyright © The Author(s) 2017. A meta-analysis of 20 manuscripts reporting on 21 unique studies (N = 19,623) was conducted to investigate the magnitude of the association between adolescent romantic relationship quality (RRQ), romantic relationship breakups (RRB) and mental health outcomes (i.e., depression, suicide ideation, deliberate self-harm, and suicide attempt). Potential moderators of these relationships were also explored. The sample included U.S. and non-U.S. adolescents (13-17 years old), and young adults (18-29 years old). Results indicated statistically significant but modest relationships between both RRQ and RRB and mental health, with the first showing a stronger association. There was some evidence suggesting this relationship may be stronger for women, but no evidence it differed as a function of nationality or age. Additional research is needed to address the distinction between clinical and non-clinical populations on specific outcomes and to further explore the role of mental health outcomes as related to romantic relationship quality and breakups. Implications for practice include the need for (a) services to individuals emotionally affected by romantic relationships, (b) relationship quality psycho-education, and (c) screenings of individuals at risk due to low romantic relationship quality or recent relationship breakup.
Authors
Mirsu-Paun, A; Oliver, JA
MLA Citation
Mirsu-Paun, A., and J. A. Oliver. “How Much Does Love Really Hurt? A Meta-Analysis of the Association between Romantic Relationship Quality, Breakups and Mental Health Outcomes in Adolescents and Young Adults.” Journal of Relationships Research, vol. 8, Feb. 2017. Scopus, doi:10.1017/jrr.2017.6.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1278709
Source
scopus
Published In
Journal of Relationships Research
Volume
8
Published Date
DOI
10.1017/jrr.2017.6

Research Areas:

Alcohol
Cognition
Drug addiction
Evoked potentials (Electrophysiology)
Functional Neuroimaging
Nicotine
Psychophysiology
Reward