Xiaofei Wang

Overview:

Design and Analysis of Clinical Trials
Nonparametric and Semiparametric Methods
Survival Analysis
Statistical Methods for Diagnostic and Predictive Medicine
Biomarker Discovery and Validation
Health Outcomes Research

Positions:

Professor of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics

Biostatistics & Bioinformatics
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2003

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Graduate Research Assistant, Computer Sciences

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Graduate Research Assistant, Biostatistics

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Grants:

Translational meta-analysis for elderly lung cancer patients

Administered By
Biostatistics & Bioinformatics
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

National Clinical Trials Network - Network Group Statistics and DMCs

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Mayo Clinic
Role
Statistician
Start Date
End Date

Cancer and Leukemia Group B Statistical Center

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Statistician
Start Date
End Date

Semiparametric ROC Curve Regression for Cancer Screening Studies

Administered By
Biostatistics & Bioinformatics
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Innovative Biomarker-Integrated Clinical Trial Design and Analysis

Administered By
Integrative Genomics
Awarded By
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Cancer Clinical Trials Current and Controversial Issues in Design and Analysis

The book covers topics that are often perplexing and sometimes controversial in cancer clinical trials. Most of the issues addressed are also important for clinical trials in other settings.
Authors
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1425523
Source
google-books
Published Date

Endpoints for Cancer Clinical Trials

Authors
George, S; Wang, X; Pang, H
MLA Citation
George, Stephen, et al. “Endpoints for Cancer Clinical Trials.” Cancer Clinical Trials: Current and Controversial Issues in Design and Analysis, edited by Stephen George et al., Chapman & Hall, 2016, pp. 3–36.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1425525
Source
manual
Published Date
Start Page
3
End Page
36

Endpoints for Cancer Clinical Trials

Authors
George, S; Wang, X; Pang, H
MLA Citation
George, Stephen, et al. “Endpoints for Cancer Clinical Trials.” Cancer Clinical Trials: Current and Controversial Issues in Design and Analysis, edited by Stephen George et al., Chapman & Hall, 2016, pp. 3–36.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1425525
Source
manual
Published Date
Start Page
3
End Page
36

Clinical and radiographic predictors of successful therapeutic bronchoscopy for the relief of malignant central airway obstruction.

BACKGROUND: Malignant central airway obstruction (CAO) occurs in approximately 20-30% of patients with lung cancer and is associated with debilitating symptoms and poor prognosis. Multimodality therapeutic bronchoscopy can relieve malignant CAO, though carries risk. Evidence to guide clinicians regarding which patients may benefit from such interventions is sparse. We aimed to assess the clinical and radiographic predictors associated with therapeutic bronchoscopy success in relieving malignant CAO. METHODS: We reviewed all cases of therapeutic bronchoscopy performed for malignant CAO at our institution from January 2010-February 2017. Therapeutic bronchoscopy success was defined as establishing airway patency of > 50%. Patient demographics and baseline characteristics, oncology history, degree of airway obstruction, procedural interventions, and complications were compared between successful and unsuccessful groups. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression identified the significant clinical and radiographic predictors for therapeutic success. The corresponding simple and conditional odds ratio were calculated. A time-to-event analysis with Kaplan-Meier plots was performed to estimate overall survival. RESULTS: During the study period, 301 therapeutic bronchoscopies were performed; 44 (14.6%) were considered unsuccessful. Factors associated with success included never vs current smoking status (OR 5.36, 95% CI:1.45-19.74, p = 0.010), patent distal airway on CT imaging (OR 15.11, 95% CI:2.98-45.83, p < 0.0001) and patent distal airway visualized during bronchoscopy (OR 10.77, 95% CI:3.63-31.95, p < 0.001) in univariate analysis. Along with patent distal airway on CT imaging, increased time from radiographic finding to therapeutic bronchoscopy was associated with lower odds of success in multivariate analysis (OR 0.96, 95% CI:0.92-1.00, p = 0.048). Median survival was longer in the successful group (10.2 months, 95% CI:4.8-20.2) compared to the unsuccessful group (6.1 months, 95% CI:2.1-10.8, log rank p = 0.015). CONCLUSIONS: Predictors associated with successful therapeutic bronchoscopy for malignant CAO include distal patent airway visualized on CT scan and during bronchoscopy. Odds of success are higher in non-smokers, and with decreased time from radiographic finding of CAO to intervention.
Authors
Giovacchini, CX; Kessler, ER; Merrick, CM; Gao, J; Wang, X; Wahidi, MM; Shofer, SL; Cheng, GZ; Mahmood, K
MLA Citation
Giovacchini, Coral X., et al. “Clinical and radiographic predictors of successful therapeutic bronchoscopy for the relief of malignant central airway obstruction..” Bmc Pulm Med, vol. 19, no. 1, Nov. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1186/s12890-019-0987-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1422331
PMID
31752776
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bmc Pulmonary Medicine
Volume
19
Published Date
Start Page
219
DOI
10.1186/s12890-019-0987-3

Definitive Radiotherapy for Inoperable Stage IIB Non-small-cell Lung Cancer: Patterns of Care and Comparative Effectiveness.

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to analyze practice patterns and perform comparative effectiveness of definitive radiotherapy techniques for inoperable stage IIB (American Joint Committee on Cancer eighth edition) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Adults in the National Cancer Database diagnosed with T3N0M0 or T1-2N1M0 NCSLC between 2004 and 2015 who received definitive radiotherapy were identified. Cases were divided as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT), or conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) and stratified by systemic therapy (ST). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the effect of covariates on overall survival (OS). Subgroup analysis by tumor size, chest wall invasion, multifocality, and ST use was performed with Kaplan-Meier estimates of OS. RESULTS: A total of 10,081 subjects met inclusion criteria: 4401 T3N0M0 (66.5% CFRT, 11.0% HFRT, and 22.5% SBRT) and 5680 T1-2N1M0 (92.5% CFRT and 7.5% HFRT). For T3N0M0 NSCLC, SBRT utilization increased from 3.7% in 2006% to 35.4% in 2015. Subjects treated with SBRT were more likely to have smaller tumors, multifocal tumors, or adenocarcinoma histology. SBRT resulted in similar or superior OS compared with CFRT for tumors > 5 cm, tumors invading the chest wall, or multifocal tumors. SBRT was significantly associated with improved OS on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 0.715; P < .001). For T1-2N1M0 NSCLC, patients treated with HFRT were significantly older and less likely to receive ST; nevertheless, there was no difference in OS between HFRT and CFRT on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: CFRT + ST is utilized most frequently to treat stage IIB NSCLC in the United States when surgery is not performed, though it is decreasing. SBRT utilization for T3N0M0 NSCLC is increasing and was associated with improved OS.
Authors
Jacobs, CD; Gao, J; Wang, X; Clarke, JM; Tong, B; Ready, NE; Suneja, G; Kelsey, CR; Torok, JA
MLA Citation
Jacobs, Corbin D., et al. “Definitive Radiotherapy for Inoperable Stage IIB Non-small-cell Lung Cancer: Patterns of Care and Comparative Effectiveness..” Clin Lung Cancer, Oct. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cllc.2019.10.005.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1422411
PMID
31757764
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clin Lung Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.cllc.2019.10.005