Jesse Troy

Overview:

I am a biostatistician supporting research in cell therapies and regenerative medicine at the Duke Marcus Center for Cellular Cures, and research studies in cancer therapeutics and palliative care at the Duke Cancer Institute. I also teach biostatistics in the Master of Biostatistics program and the Clinical Research Training Program at Duke.

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics

Biostatistics & Bioinformatics
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2012

University of Pittsburgh

Grants:

Marcus Foundation Phase II MSC ASD

Administered By
Institutes and Centers
Awarded By
The Marcus Foundation
Role
Statistician
Start Date
End Date

"Understanding the Patient Experience of Stage 3 Unresectable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) in the Immuno-oncology Era"

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
AstraZeneca PLC
Role
Statistician
Start Date
End Date

Enabling effective anti-tumor immunity from targeted antibodies through dual innate and adaptive immune checkpoint blockade in non-immunogenic cancers

Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Smartphone Enabled Point-of-Care Detection of Serum Markers of Liver Cancer

Administered By
Biomedical Engineering
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

High Fidelity Diffusion MRI for Children with Cerebral Palsy in Stem Cell Therapy

Administered By
Duke-UNC Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

The biomedical research pyramid: A model for the practice of biostatistics

Biostatisticians apply statistical methods to solve problems in the biological sciences. Successful practioners of biostatistics have advanced technical knowledge, are skilled communicators, and can seamlesslessly integrate with interdisciplinary scientific teams. Despite the breadth of skills required for success in this field, most biostatistics education programs place heavier emphasis on development of technical skills than skills necessary for collaborative work, including critical thinking, writing, and public speaking. Our master's degree program in biostatistics aims for stronger integration of education in collaborative work alongside development of technical knowledge in biostatistics. Toward that end, we propose a model that provides students with a mental map for practicing biostatistics, and that can serve as a tool for faculty to create hands-on learning experiences for biostatistics students. The model helps students organize their knowledge of biostatistics, unifying the technical and collaborative aspects of the discipline in a single framework that can be applied across the broad array of activities that biostatisticians engage in. In this article we describe the model in detail and provide an initial assessment of whether the model might meet its intended purpose by applying the model to a common task for practicing biostatisticians and biostatistics students: describing the results of a medical research study.
Authors
Troy, JD; Neely, ML; Grambow, SC; Samsa, GP
MLA Citation
Troy, J. D., et al. “The biomedical research pyramid: A model for the practice of biostatistics.” Journal of Curriculum and Teaching, vol. 10, no. 1, Feb. 2021, pp. 10–17. Scopus, doi:10.5430/jct.v10n1p10.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1475473
Source
scopus
Published In
Journal of Curriculum and Teaching
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
10
End Page
17
DOI
10.5430/jct.v10n1p10

The National MDS Natural History Study: design of an integrated data and sample biorepository to promote research studies in myelodysplastic syndromes.

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a spectrum of heterogeneous hematopoietic stem cell diseases, vary in clinical severity, response to therapy, and propensity toward progression to acute myeloid leukemia. These are acquired clonal disorders resulting from somatic mutations within the hematopoietic stem or progenitor cell population. Understanding the natural history and the risk of developing leukemia and other adverse outcomes is dependent on access to well-annotated biospecimens linked to robust clinical and molecular data. To facilitate the acquisition and distribution of MDS biospecimens to the wider scientific community and support scientific discovery in this disease, the National MDS Natural History study was initiated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and is being conducted in collaboration with community hospitals and academic medical centers supported by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The study will recruit up to 2000 MDS patients or overlapping myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) and up to 500 cases of idiopathic cytopenia of undetermined significance (ICUS). The National MDS Natural History Study (NCT02775383) will offer the world's largest disease-focused tissue biobank linked to longitudinal clinical and molecular data in MDS. Here, we report on the study design features and describe the vanguard phase of 200 cases. The study assembles a comprehensive clinical database, quality of life results, laboratory data, histopathology slides and images, genetic information, hematopoietic and germline tissues representing high-quality biospecimens and data from diverse centers across the United States. These resources will be available to the scientific community for investigator-initiated research.
Authors
Sekeres, MA; Gore, SD; Stablein, DM; DiFronzo, N; Abel, GA; DeZern, AE; Troy, JD; Rollison, DE; Thomas, JW; Waclawiw, MA; Liu, JJ; Al Baghdadi, T; Walter, MJ; Bejar, R; Gorak, EJ; Starczynowski, DT; Foran, JM; Cerhan, JR; Moscinski, LC; Komrokji, RS; Deeg, HJ; Epling-Burnette, PK
MLA Citation
Sekeres, Mikkael A., et al. “The National MDS Natural History Study: design of an integrated data and sample biorepository to promote research studies in myelodysplastic syndromes.Leuk Lymphoma, vol. 60, no. 13, Dec. 2019, pp. 3161–71. Pubmed, doi:10.1080/10428194.2019.1616186.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1386345
PMID
31111762
Source
pubmed
Published In
Leuk Lymphoma
Volume
60
Published Date
Start Page
3161
End Page
3171
DOI
10.1080/10428194.2019.1616186

4.13 Validity of Automated Methods for Assessing Child Communication Abilities (LENA) in an Autism Clinical Trial

Authors
Sabatos-DeVito, M; McVea, M; Franz, L; Troy, J; Dawson, G
MLA Citation
Sabatos-DeVito, Maura, et al. “4.13 Validity of Automated Methods for Assessing Child Communication Abilities (LENA) in an Autism Clinical Trial.” Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 56, no. 10, Elsevier BV, 2017, pp. S232–S232. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.jaac.2017.09.229.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452689
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume
56
Published Date
Start Page
S232
End Page
S232
DOI
10.1016/j.jaac.2017.09.229

Institutional approaches to preventing questionable research practices.

Questionable research practices (QRP) are actions taken by researchers that span a range of concern related to violation of research best practices, and ultimately expose institutions and research participants to risk. Numerous studies have shown that QRP are common. The continued prevalence of QRP indicates that existing approaches for dealing with QRP are falling short. In this editorial we discuss the risks associated with QRP and propose mitigation strategies at the institutional level using a common QRP as an example, questionable treatment of subgroup analyses. We argue that the need for institutional intervention in cases such as this are particularly motivating when both the investigator and the institution have a substantial financial conflict of interest related to intellectual property that requires the investigator's expertise to continue developing. To address this, we propose an expansion of the traditional conflict of interest management process.
Authors
Troy, JD; Rockhold, F; Samsa, GP
MLA Citation
Troy, Jesse D., et al. “Institutional approaches to preventing questionable research practices.Account Res, Oct. 2021, pp. 1–8. Pubmed, doi:10.1080/08989621.2021.1986017.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497208
PMID
34569387
Source
pubmed
Published In
Account Res
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
8
DOI
10.1080/08989621.2021.1986017

Sex difference in immune response to vaccination: A participant-level meta-analysis of randomized trials of IMVAMUNE smallpox vaccine.

INTRODUCTION: Previous research shows immune response to vaccination differs by sex but this has not been explored for IMVAMUNE, a replication-deficient smallpox vaccine developed in response to the potential for bioterrorism using smallpox. METHODS: We conducted a participant-level meta-analysis (N=275, 136 men, 139 women) of 3 randomized trials of IMVAMUNE conducted at 13 centers in the US through a federally-funded extramural research program. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they tested the standard dose (1×10(8)TCID₅₀/mL on Days 0 and 28) of liquid formulation IMVAMUNE, were completed at the time of our search, and enrolled healthy vaccinia-naïve participants. Models of the peak log₂ ELISA and PRNT titers post-second vaccination were constructed for each study with sex as a covariate. Results from these models were combined into random effects meta-analyses of the sex difference in response to IMVAMUNE. We then compared this approach with fixed effects models using the combined participant level data. RESULTS: In each study the mean peak log₂ ELISA titer was higher in men than women but no single study demonstrated a statistically significant difference. Combination of the adjusted study-specific estimates into the random effects model showed a higher mean peak log₂-titer in men compared with women (absolute difference [men-women]: 0.32, 95% CI: 0.02-0.60). Fixed effects models controlling for study showed a similar result (log₂ ELISA titer, men-women: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.04-0.63). This equates to a geometric mean peak titer that is approximately 27% higher in men than women (95% CI: 3-55%). Peak log₂ PRNT titers were also higher (although not significantly) in men (men-women: 0.14, 95% CI: -0.30 to 0.58). CONCLUSION: Our results show statistically significant differences in response to IMVAMUNE comparing healthy, vaccinia-naïve men with women and suggest that sex should be considered in further development and deployment of IMVAMUNE and other MVA-based vaccines.
Authors
Troy, JD; Hill, HR; Ewell, MG; Frey, SE
MLA Citation
Troy, Jesse D., et al. “Sex difference in immune response to vaccination: A participant-level meta-analysis of randomized trials of IMVAMUNE smallpox vaccine.Vaccine, vol. 33, no. 41, Oct. 2015, pp. 5425–31. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.08.032.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1087638
PMID
26319063
Source
pubmed
Published In
Vaccine
Volume
33
Published Date
Start Page
5425
End Page
5431
DOI
10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.08.032

Research Areas:

Adolescent
Adult
Biostatistics
Cellular therapy
Child
Epidemiology
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Hematological oncology
Mouth Neoplasms
Myelodysplastic Syndromes
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Transplantation