Sarah Wilson

Overview:

Sarah M. Wilson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at the Duke University School of Medicine, with a secondary appointment in the Department of Population Health Sciences and a faculty affiliation in the Duke Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research. She is also an Investigator at the VA Center of Innovation to Accelerate Discovery and Practice Transformation and a practicing clinical psychologist at the Durham VA Health Care System. She serves as the Co-Lead of the Duke Sexual and Gender Minority Health Program, the LGBTQ+ Veteran Care Coordinator for the Durham VA Health Care System, and the Associate Director of the Duke Center for AIDS Research Social and Behavioral Sciences Core.

Dr. Wilson's research focuses on testing and implementation of interventions for substance use, psychological symptoms, and health behavior change in populations who experience systemic oppression, including Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC), low-income individuals, and sexual and gender minorities. Her clinical work focuses on mental health care for patients with comorbid mental health concerns and stress due to systemic oppression, as well as training for health care professionals on LGBTQ-affirmative care.

Dr. Wilson has expertise in health equity, social determinants of health, community engagement, intervention development, and implementation science. She is currently funded on a 5-year VA HSR&D Career Development Award, IK2 HX002398, "A Personalized mHealth Approach to Smoking Cessation for Veterans Living with HIV."

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine & Neurosciences
School of Medicine

Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2015

Duke University

Grants:

Leveraging Local Health System Electronic Health Record Data to Enhance PrEP Access in Southeastern Louisiana: A Community-Informed Approach (R01)

Administered By
Medicine, Infectious Diseases
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Sexual and Gender Minority (SGM) Mental Health In Low and Middle Income Countries (SMILE)

Administered By
Center for Health Policy & Inequalities Research
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Project Uplift

Administered By
Center for Health Policy & Inequalities Research
Awarded By
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Role
Counselor
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Accelerating the Growth of Evidence-Based Care for Women and Men Veterans.

Authors
Goldstein, KM; Bastian, LA; Duan-Porter, W; Gray, KE; Hoggatt, KJ; Kelly, MM; Wilson, SM; Humphreys, K; Klap, R; Yano, EM; Huang, GD
MLA Citation
Goldstein, Karen M., et al. “Accelerating the Growth of Evidence-Based Care for Women and Men Veterans.Womens Health Issues, vol. 29 Suppl 1, June 2019, pp. S2–5. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.whi.2019.05.004.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1393629
PMID
31253238
Source
pubmed
Published In
Womens Health Issues
Volume
29 Suppl 1
Published Date
Start Page
S2
End Page
S5
DOI
10.1016/j.whi.2019.05.004

Impact of Cigarette Smoking Status on Pain Intensity Among Veterans With and Without Hepatitis C.

OBJECTIVE: Chronic pain is a significant problem in patients living with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Tobacco smoking is an independent risk factor for high pain intensity among veterans. This study aims to examine the independent associations with smoking and HCV on pain intensity, as well as the interaction of smoking and HCV on the association with pain intensity. DESIGN/PARTICPANTS: Cross-sectional analysis of a cohort study of veterans of Operations Enduring Freedom/Iraqi Freedom/New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND) who had at least one visit to a Veterans Health Administration (VHA) primary care clinic between 2001 and 2014. METHODS: HCV was identified using ICD-9 codes from electronic medical records (EMRs). Pain intensity, reported on a 0-10 numeric rating scale, was categorized as none/mild (0-3) and moderate/severe (4-10). RESULTS: Among 654,841 OEF/OIF/OND veterans (median age [interquartile range] = 26 [23-36] years), 2,942 (0.4%) were diagnosed with HCV. Overall, moderate/severe pain intensity was reported in 36% of veterans, and 37% were current smokers. The adjusted odds of reporting moderate/severe pain intensity were 1.23 times higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14-1.33) for those with HCV and 1.26 times higher (95% CI = 1.25-1.28) for current smokers. In the interaction model, there was a significant Smoking Status × HCV interaction (P = 0.03). Among veterans with HCV, smoking had a significantly larger association with moderate/severe pain (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.50, P < 0.001) than among veterans without HCV (adjusted OR = 1.26, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: We found that current smoking is more strongly linked to pain intensity among veterans with HCV. Further investigations are needed to explore the impact of smoking status on pain and to promote smoking cessation and pain management in veterans with HCV.
Authors
Lynch, SM; Wilson, SM; DeRycke, EC; Driscoll, MA; Becker, WC; Goulet, JL; Kerns, RD; Mattocks, KM; Brandt, CA; Bathulapalli, H; Skanderson, M; Haskell, SG; Bastian, LA
MLA Citation
Lynch, Shaina M., et al. “Impact of Cigarette Smoking Status on Pain Intensity Among Veterans With and Without Hepatitis C.Pain Med, vol. 19, no. suppl_1, Sept. 2018, pp. S5–11. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/pm/pny146.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1351039
PMID
30203017
Source
pubmed
Published In
Pain Med
Volume
19
Published Date
Start Page
S5
End Page
S11
DOI
10.1093/pm/pny146

Psychological Symptoms and Social Functioning Following Repair of Obstetric Fistula in a Low-Income Setting.

Objectives Obstetric fistula is a maternal injury that causes uncontrollable leaking of urine or stool, and most women who develop it live in poverty in low-income countries. Obstetric fistula is associated with high rates of stigma and psychological morbidity, but there is uncertainty about the impact of surgical treatment on psychological outcomes. The objective of this exploratory study was to examine changes in psychological symptoms following surgical fistula repair, discharge and reintegration home. Methods Women admitted for surgical repair of obstetric fistula were recruited from a Tanzanian hospital serving a rural catchment area. Psychological symptoms and social functioning were assessed prior to surgery. Approximately 3 months after discharge, a data collector visited the patients' homes to repeat psychosocial measures and assess self-reported incontinence. Baseline to follow-up differences were measured with paired t tests controlling for multiple comparisons. Associations between psychological outcomes and leaking were assessed with t tests and Pearson correlations. Results Participants (N = 28) had been living with fistula for an average of 11 years. Baseline psychological distress was high, and decreased significantly at follow-up. Participants who self-reported continued incontinence at follow-up endorsed significantly higher PTSD and depression symptoms than those who reported being cured, and severity of leaking was associated with psychological distress. Conclusions Fistula patients experience improvements in mental health at 3 months after discharge, but these improvements are curtailed when women experience residual leaking. Given the rate of stress incontinence following surgery, it is important to prepare fistula patients for the possibility of incomplete cure and help them develop appropriate coping strategies.
Authors
Wilson, SM; Sikkema, KJ; Watt, MH; Masenga, GG; Mosha, MV
MLA Citation
Wilson, Sarah M., et al. “Psychological Symptoms and Social Functioning Following Repair of Obstetric Fistula in a Low-Income Setting.Matern Child Health J, vol. 20, no. 5, May 2016, pp. 941–45. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s10995-016-1950-z.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1126046
PMID
27010550
Source
pubmed
Published In
Matern Child Health J
Volume
20
Published Date
Start Page
941
End Page
945
DOI
10.1007/s10995-016-1950-z

Receipt and predictors of smoking cessation pharmacotherapy among veterans with and without HIV.

Smoking is highly prevalent among people living with HIV (PLWH) and increases cardiovascular risk. Pharmacotherapies such as nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), bupropion, and varenicline help to reduce smoking, though rates of receipt among PLWH compared with HIV-uninfected persons are unknown. Among 814 PLWH and 908 uninfected patients enrolled in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (2012-2017) who reported current smoking, we used marginal multivariable log-linear regression models to estimate adjusted relative risks (ARR) of receiving pharmacotherapy by HIV status. We also assessed patient-level factors associated with pharmacotherapy receipt within each group. In multivariable analyses, receipt of NRT was less likely among PLWH relative to uninfected participants (ARR 0.77, 95% CI 0.67, 0.89). In both populations, documented mental health disorders and contemplation to quit were associated with greater likelihood of receiving pharmacotherapy. Further research is needed to explore potential treatment disparities.
Authors
Shahrir, S; Crothers, K; McGinnis, KA; Chan, KCG; Baeten, JM; Wilson, SM; Butt, AA; Pisani, MA; Baldassarri, SR; Justice, A; Williams, EC
MLA Citation
Shahrir, Shahida, et al. “Receipt and predictors of smoking cessation pharmacotherapy among veterans with and without HIV.Prog Cardiovasc Dis, vol. 63, no. 2, 2020, pp. 118–24. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.pcad.2020.01.003.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1486389
PMID
31987807
Source
pubmed
Published In
Prog Cardiovasc Dis
Volume
63
Published Date
Start Page
118
End Page
124
DOI
10.1016/j.pcad.2020.01.003

Experiences of social support among women presenting for obstetric fistula repair surgery in Tanzania.

OBJECTIVE: An obstetric fistula is a childbirth injury resulting in uncontrollable leakage of urine and/or feces and can lead to physical and psychological challenges, including social isolation. Prior to and after fistula repair surgery, social support can help a woman to reintegrate into her community. The aim of this study was to preliminarily examine the experiences of social support among Tanzanian women presenting with obstetric fistula in the periods immediately preceding obstetric fistula repair surgery and following reintegration. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study used a mixed-methods design to analyze cross-sectional surveys (n=59) and in-depth interviews (n=20). RESULTS: Women reported widely varying levels of social support from family members and partners, with half of the sample reporting overall high levels of social support. For women experiencing lower levels of support, fistula often exacerbated existing problems in relationships, sometimes directly causing separation or divorce. Many women were assertive and resilient with regard to advocating for their fistula care and relationship needs. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that while some women endure negative social experiences following an obstetric fistula and require additional resources and services, many women report high levels of social support from family members and partners, which may be harnessed to improve the holistic care for patients.
Authors
Dennis, AC; Wilson, SM; Mosha, MV; Masenga, GG; Sikkema, KJ; Terroso, KE; Watt, MH
MLA Citation
Dennis, Alexis C., et al. “Experiences of social support among women presenting for obstetric fistula repair surgery in Tanzania.Int J Womens Health, vol. 8, 2016, pp. 429–39. Pubmed, doi:10.2147/IJWH.S110202.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1146526
PMID
27660492
Source
pubmed
Published In
International Journal of Women'S Health
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
429
End Page
439
DOI
10.2147/IJWH.S110202