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We invite you to share your story to help raise awareness. If you have been or are being treated for cancer at Duke or if you are a caregiver, we'd like to know how cancer care, research or clinical trials at Duke has affected your life. Are you a donor? If so, please consider sharing you story. Tell us why you choose to team up with Duke Cancer Institute. For more information or to share your story, please contact Sara Wajda, Director of Annual Giving, DCI Development.

#MyDukeCancerStory: A Helping Hand

Substitute teacher Tim McKenna, was teaching history at the Durham School of the Arts on April 10 when a gas explosion ripped through a downtown Durham office building and coffee shop on the next block. “Foam baffles started coming down from the ceiling and I just ran into the hall and grabbed...

#MyDukeCancerStory: A Fair Shake

When Nadine Barrett, PhD , was 15, she and her mother traveled from their home in Wimbledon, England to New York City and ended up staying; making a home in Brooklyn. They were immigrants seeking “new opportunities to advance their education and career,” Barrett said, and undocumented. “We lived in...

Spring 2019 Breakthroughs Message From The Director

Fighting cancer means creating new treatments, certainly. However, at Duke Cancer Institute (DCI), it means so much more. Finding creative ways to prevent cancer. Ensuring that clinical trials of new treatments reflect our diverse population. Pioneering “liquid biopsies” to help doctors provide...

Getting Real with Clinical Trials

Most studies of new treatments don't reflect the diversity of people in the real world. That's a problem. THE NEXT TIME YOU TAKE A MEDICATION, CONSIDER THIS: It’s available because it was shown to be safe and effective in clinical trials. In these controlled studies, researchers give a new...

Liquid Biopsies Smooth The Way For Personalized Medicine

What if just two vials of your blood could tell doctors which cancer treatment would work best for you? By design, some of the newest and most exciting cancer treatments don’t work for everybody. Instead, they target tumors that have a specific genetic mutation or characteristic. A treatment like...

Creating Answers

Nancy Davenport-Ennis has survived cancer twice. One of her many strategies for thriving—look for ways to help others. That’s how, in 1996, Davenport-Ennis found herself in a 10 by 10 room in a warehouse with a rented desk and chair and a seven-year-old computer and printer. She had quit her job as...

A Plan to Give Back

Ever since Duke Cancer Institute helped Meg Lindenberger survive breast cancer 10 years ago, she and her husband, Bill, have been faithful supporters. “The Bible tells us that what we own on earth doesn't really belong to us. We believe that,” Meg says. Duke also helped their daughter, Kim, through...

Program For Young Adults With Cancer Gets A Boost

Teen and young adult cancer patients will receive expanded services at Duke, thanks to a $400,000 award from First Citizens Bank and Teen Cancer America. “Duke Cancer Institute, Teen Cancer America, and First Citizens Bank share a passion for helping teens and young adults facing cancer,” says...

Cancer Prevention: Making It Easy Like Sunday Morning

GILDA SUITER, 54, OF DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA, struggled with gastroesophageal reflux disease, known as acid reflux, for several years. Two years ago, her doctor recommended that she take a urea breath test—a non-invasive diagnostic test to detect a common bacterium called Helicobacter pylori (H...

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