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We invite you to share your story to help raise awareness. If you have been or are being treated for cancer at Duke or if you are a caregiver, we'd like to know how cancer care, research or clinical trials at Duke has affected your life. Are you a donor? If so, please consider sharing you story. Tell us why you choose to team up with Duke Cancer Institute. For more information or to share your story, please contact Elisabeth Wharton, Assistant Director of Annual Giving, DCI Development.

#MyDukeCancerStory: On Teardrop Time

“Those are the grandchildren from Florida —you can tell they weren’t happy about that picture— and there’s one of my paintings — I sold it — and these are the Christmas stockings I made,” Karin, 63, smiles as she scrolls through photos on her husband David’s smartphone. “That’s our son’s wedding; I...

#MyDukeCancerStory: A Helping Hand

Substitute teacher Tim McKenna, was teaching history at the Durham School of the Arts on April 10 when a gas explosion ripped through a downtown Durham office building and coffee shop on the next block. “Foam baffles started coming down from the ceiling and I just ran into the hall and grabbed...

Creating Answers

Nancy Davenport-Ennis has survived cancer twice. One of her many strategies for thriving—look for ways to help others. That’s how, in 1996, Davenport-Ennis found herself in a 10 by 10 room in a warehouse with a rented desk and chair and a seven-year-old computer and printer. She had quit her job as...

Program For Young Adults With Cancer Gets A Boost

Teen and young adult cancer patients will receive expanded services at Duke, thanks to a $400,000 award from First Citizens Bank and Teen Cancer America. “Duke Cancer Institute, Teen Cancer America, and First Citizens Bank share a passion for helping teens and young adults facing cancer,” says...

Cancer Prevention: Making It Easy Like Sunday Morning

GILDA SUITER, 54, OF DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA, struggled with gastroesophageal reflux disease, known as acid reflux, for several years. Two years ago, her doctor recommended that she take a urea breath test—a non-invasive diagnostic test to detect a common bacterium called Helicobacter pylori (H...

#MyDukeCancerStory: One Size Does Not Fit All

In 2004, Dennis Dunlow, now 47, experienced the moment that redefined his life: the birth of his triplets. Two years later, he experienced that thrilling moment all over again when his family welcomed their youngest son, making him a father of four. For Dunlow, his family has always been the...

#MyDukeCancerStory: Virginia Woman Speaks Out

Leigh Zagorski, 32, was born and raised in Norfolk, Virginia. After graduating high school, she entered the restaurant industry, starting out at 18 years old as a server and working her way up the ranks to management. While the money was good, benefits were most often nonexistent or cost...

#MyDukeCancerStory: When Diagnosed With Prostate Cancer, It Was Sink Or Swim For Military Vet

When Robert “Bob” List, 73, a retired colonel with the U.S. Marine Corps, was diagnosed with stage 2 prostate cancer in June 2006, he immediately began to research the “enemy” threatening to take his life. For more than 26 years List’s sole focus was to lead his men in tactical planning. No less...

Fall 2018 Breakthroughs Message From The Director

At Duke Cancer Institute, inspired by the bravery of our patients, we don’t shrink from even the most daunting challenges. We tackle them head-on.

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